+- +-

+- User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 119
Latest: Bella_777
New This Month: 2
New This Week: 1
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 17081
Total Topics: 874
Most Online Today: 255
Most Online Ever: 771
(July 30, 2019, 01:13:39 am)
Users Online
Members: 3
Guests: 86
Total: 89

Author Topic: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide  (Read 2158 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #39 on: June 30, 2020, 10:52:36 pm »
Venezuelan Immigrant Explains Why She Is Worried About The Current Situation
Elizabeth Rogliani explains how the current situation is similar to what she experienced growing up in Venezuela.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1ii7E6R6lA
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
Informative Informative x 1 View List

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #40 on: June 30, 2020, 11:50:59 pm »
Rioters Destroying Statues
Statues honoring George Washington, General Ulysess S. Grant (who DEFEATED the Confederacy), the author of the National Anthem, and other important figures in history have been destroyed.

This is not about promoting racial harmony—it's about hating America.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyqiY9piAbQ
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
Informative Informative x 1 View List

Bladerunner

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1928
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • My Friend
  • Location: Tennessee, USA
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #41 on: July 01, 2020, 12:14:23 am »
Rioters Destroying Statues
Statues honoring George Washington, General Ulysess S. Grant (who DEFEATED the Confederacy), the author of the National Anthem, and other important figures in history have been destroyed.

This is not about promoting racial harmony—it's about hating America.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyqiY9piAbQ


more like worldwide....

ignorant people.

Blade
1 Cor 15:3-4.."For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:"

Acts 17:11.."These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so."

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #42 on: July 01, 2020, 02:43:34 pm »
The Candace Owens Show: Marc Lamont Hill
Is Black Lives Matter hurting or helping the Black community? Does it represent — or is it a diversion from — the Dream of Martin Luther King, Jr.? Candace Owens and Marc Lamont Hill discuss race relations in America from opposite ends of the political aisle.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjDUUU-Z-aI
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #43 on: July 01, 2020, 02:53:33 pm »
July 4 Is Cancelled | The Ben Shapiro Show Ep. 1043
Corporations pull their money from social media at the behest of the Leftist censors; covid-19 cases continue to rise, but hospitals aren’t overwhelmed; and Pharrell Williams announces July 4th is cancelled.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGJy6ZS3n4w
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #44 on: July 02, 2020, 05:27:28 am »
Standing up for Black lives does not mean tearing down our history
Dr. Benjamin S. Carson Sr.
NBC News


Throughout our history, Independence Day has been an important occasion of remembrance for Americans. We reflect on the founding principles of our great nation, we celebrate those who helped fight for the freedoms we defend today, and we honor the heroic sacrifice it took to launch the greatest experiment the world has ever seen.

Sadly, the present day feels different. The news is regularly filled with stories of anarchists and angry mobs showing blatant disregard for America's artifacts and historical sites, desecrating these tributes to our long journey toward liberty and justice for all.

In Portland, Oregon, we saw a statue of George Washington torn down. In Washington, D.C., we saw the World War II Memorial vandalized. In Madison, Wisconsin, protestors pulled down a statue of Hans Christian Heg, a fierce abolitionist and someone who made the ultimate sacrifice to free slaves.

This raises the question: What are these people fighting for? Or better yet, what are they fighting against?

Each of these monuments represents a moment in time, an important place or an influential figure who sacrificed for the good of their country. How have we reached a point in our nation's history in which these figures are not celebrated, but villainized and shamed?

America continues to hold certain truths — life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness — to be self-evident, and we should work each and every day democratically, as our Founding Fathers intended, to improve and ensure these rights for all.

To do so, mayors and governors must immediately condemn the vandalization of statues and dismantle autonomous zones. Destroying our history, wrecking our communities and inhibiting our law enforcement officers will only result in more tyranny, not more freedom. In fact, what we have seen these past few weeks is chaos, lawlessness, even murder.

It is up to leaders in this country to emulate our Founding Fathers and stand up to this retraction from law and order, which in no way reflects our morals, let alone our democratic values.

It is also up to us as American citizens to recognize hatred and stand up for freedom. We can celebrate Black lives and speak out against mob rule, censorship and anarchy at the same time. Shaming our neighbors into conforming with movements like "defund the police" and insinuating that if you are not for these movements you are not standing up for Black lives is nonsensical and irresponsible.

I am not denying that racism is real. It is, but I do not think it is widely espoused. In fact, I believe opposition to racism is a more commonly held belief, as we have seen in the thousands of people marching for equality and justice nationwide. Racism does not define us as a country; our commitment to freedom does.

Hate and guilt-shaming are not helpful for society to improve and move forward. Instead, we should embrace the central American value of freedom. The freedom to worship the religion of your choice. The freedom to hold differing political ideologies. The freedom to choose your occupation and your own path in life. The freedom to peaceably protest your government.

We are beyond blessed to call the Land of the Free our home. Only in America can I be born a poor Black boy raised in poverty by a single mother and climb the ladder of opportunity to become a brain surgeon and then a member of the president's Cabinet. These dreams would not be possible in socialist Venezuela, communist China or authoritarian North Korea.

But these dreams are possible here — in America. Thanks to our Founding Fathers who learned from history and revered it, to those civil rights heroes who dared to dream and to our men and women in uniform who chose to defend a free land for all. I honor them this week, and I pray that more of us bravely attempt to emulate them today rather than tear down homages to their memory.

America will continue to be the beacon of hope and freedom to the world if we remember and rededicate ourselves to our defining principles: All men are created equal and are endowed with unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/standing-up-for-black-lives-does-not-mean-tearing-down-our-history/ar-BB16f9Wt?ocid=msedgntp
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

Bladerunner

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1928
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • My Friend
  • Location: Tennessee, USA
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #45 on: July 02, 2020, 09:10:15 am »
Standing up for Black lives does not mean tearing down our history
Dr. Benjamin S. Carson Sr.
NBC News


Throughout our history, Independence Day has been an important occasion of remembrance for Americans. We reflect on the founding principles of our great nation, we celebrate those who helped fight for the freedoms we defend today, and we honor the heroic sacrifice it took to launch the greatest experiment the world has ever seen.

Sadly, the present day feels different. The news is regularly filled with stories of anarchists and angry mobs showing blatant disregard for America's artifacts and historical sites, desecrating these tributes to our long journey toward liberty and justice for all.

In Portland, Oregon, we saw a statue of George Washington torn down. In Washington, D.C., we saw the World War II Memorial vandalized. In Madison, Wisconsin, protestors pulled down a statue of Hans Christian Heg, a fierce abolitionist and someone who made the ultimate sacrifice to free slaves.

This raises the question: What are these people fighting for? Or better yet, what are they fighting against?

Each of these monuments represents a moment in time, an important place or an influential figure who sacrificed for the good of their country. How have we reached a point in our nation's history in which these figures are not celebrated, but villainized and shamed?

America continues to hold certain truths — life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness — to be self-evident, and we should work each and every day democratically, as our Founding Fathers intended, to improve and ensure these rights for all.

To do so, mayors and governors must immediately condemn the vandalization of statues and dismantle autonomous zones. Destroying our history, wrecking our communities and inhibiting our law enforcement officers will only result in more tyranny, not more freedom. In fact, what we have seen these past few weeks is chaos, lawlessness, even murder.

It is up to leaders in this country to emulate our Founding Fathers and stand up to this retraction from law and order, which in no way reflects our morals, let alone our democratic values.

It is also up to us as American citizens to recognize hatred and stand up for freedom. We can celebrate Black lives and speak out against mob rule, censorship and anarchy at the same time. Shaming our neighbors into conforming with movements like "defund the police" and insinuating that if you are not for these movements you are not standing up for Black lives is nonsensical and irresponsible.

I am not denying that racism is real. It is, but I do not think it is widely espoused. In fact, I believe opposition to racism is a more commonly held belief, as we have seen in the thousands of people marching for equality and justice nationwide. Racism does not define us as a country; our commitment to freedom does.

Hate and guilt-shaming are not helpful for society to improve and move forward. Instead, we should embrace the central American value of freedom. The freedom to worship the religion of your choice. The freedom to hold differing political ideologies. The freedom to choose your occupation and your own path in life. The freedom to peaceably protest your government.

We are beyond blessed to call the Land of the Free our home. Only in America can I be born a poor Black boy raised in poverty by a single mother and climb the ladder of opportunity to become a brain surgeon and then a member of the president's Cabinet. These dreams would not be possible in socialist Venezuela, communist China or authoritarian North Korea.

But these dreams are possible here — in America. Thanks to our Founding Fathers who learned from history and revered it, to those civil rights heroes who dared to dream and to our men and women in uniform who chose to defend a free land for all. I honor them this week, and I pray that more of us bravely attempt to emulate them today rather than tear down homages to their memory.

America will continue to be the beacon of hope and freedom to the world if we remember and rededicate ourselves to our defining principles: All men are created equal and are endowed with unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/standing-up-for-black-lives-does-not-mean-tearing-down-our-history/ar-BB16f9Wt?ocid=msedgntp

The Problem I see is the democratic party. They are trying to maintain CONTROL over most of the Americans who happen to had a different skin color, ok..Black American.   They still enslave them as suredly as they did in the early 1800s.

Blade
1 Cor 15:3-4.."For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:"

Acts 17:11.."These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so."
Agree Agree x 1 View List

Bladerunner

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1928
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • My Friend
  • Location: Tennessee, USA
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #46 on: July 02, 2020, 09:12:08 am »
Standing up for Black lives does not mean tearing down our history
Dr. Benjamin S. Carson Sr.
NBC News


Throughout our history, Independence Day has been an important occasion of remembrance for Americans. We reflect on the founding principles of our great nation, we celebrate those who helped fight for the freedoms we defend today, and we honor the heroic sacrifice it took to launch the greatest experiment the world has ever seen.

Sadly, the present day feels different. The news is regularly filled with stories of anarchists and angry mobs showing blatant disregard for America's artifacts and historical sites, desecrating these tributes to our long journey toward liberty and justice for all.

In Portland, Oregon, we saw a statue of George Washington torn down. In Washington, D.C., we saw the World War II Memorial vandalized. In Madison, Wisconsin, protestors pulled down a statue of Hans Christian Heg, a fierce abolitionist and someone who made the ultimate sacrifice to free slaves.

This raises the question: What are these people fighting for? Or better yet, what are they fighting against?

Each of these monuments represents a moment in time, an important place or an influential figure who sacrificed for the good of their country. How have we reached a point in our nation's history in which these figures are not celebrated, but villainized and shamed?

America continues to hold certain truths — life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness — to be self-evident, and we should work each and every day democratically, as our Founding Fathers intended, to improve and ensure these rights for all.

To do so, mayors and governors must immediately condemn the vandalization of statues and dismantle autonomous zones. Destroying our history, wrecking our communities and inhibiting our law enforcement officers will only result in more tyranny, not more freedom. In fact, what we have seen these past few weeks is chaos, lawlessness, even murder.

It is up to leaders in this country to emulate our Founding Fathers and stand up to this retraction from law and order, which in no way reflects our morals, let alone our democratic values.

It is also up to us as American citizens to recognize hatred and stand up for freedom. We can celebrate Black lives and speak out against mob rule, censorship and anarchy at the same time. Shaming our neighbors into conforming with movements like "defund the police" and insinuating that if you are not for these movements you are not standing up for Black lives is nonsensical and irresponsible.

I am not denying that racism is real. It is, but I do not think it is widely espoused. In fact, I believe opposition to racism is a more commonly held belief, as we have seen in the thousands of people marching for equality and justice nationwide. Racism does not define us as a country; our commitment to freedom does.

Hate and guilt-shaming are not helpful for society to improve and move forward. Instead, we should embrace the central American value of freedom. The freedom to worship the religion of your choice. The freedom to hold differing political ideologies. The freedom to choose your occupation and your own path in life. The freedom to peaceably protest your government.

We are beyond blessed to call the Land of the Free our home. Only in America can I be born a poor Black boy raised in poverty by a single mother and climb the ladder of opportunity to become a brain surgeon and then a member of the president's Cabinet. These dreams would not be possible in socialist Venezuela, communist China or authoritarian North Korea.

But these dreams are possible here — in America. Thanks to our Founding Fathers who learned from history and revered it, to those civil rights heroes who dared to dream and to our men and women in uniform who chose to defend a free land for all. I honor them this week, and I pray that more of us bravely attempt to emulate them today rather than tear down homages to their memory.

America will continue to be the beacon of hope and freedom to the world if we remember and rededicate ourselves to our defining principles: All men are created equal and are endowed with unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/standing-up-for-black-lives-does-not-mean-tearing-down-our-history/ar-BB16f9Wt?ocid=msedgntp

The Problem I see is the democratic party. They are trying to maintain CONTROL over most of the Americans who happen to had a different skin color, ok..Black American.   They still enslave them as suredly as they did in the early 1800s.

Blade

While Black Lives matter, what about the millions of black babies killed each year. what about all the blacks that are killed by blacks each year...This experiment in Settle resulted in two blacks being killed for what?

Blade
1 Cor 15:3-4.."For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:"

Acts 17:11.."These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so."
Agree Agree x 1 View List

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #47 on: July 02, 2020, 09:47:33 am »
There was an interesting news story from 2017.

A warning from George Orwell on the ‘monument wars’

The left wants to attack the very legitimacy of America, of which Washington is the real symbol. And going after statues and other cultural icons is part of the Marxist playbook.

It was written about by George Orwell in his dystopian novel “1984,” a quote from which is making the rounds this week.

In it, one of Orwell’s characters warns of how “every book has been rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street and building has been renamed, every date has been altered.”

“And that process is continuing day by day and minute by minute,” adds Orwell’s character. “History has stopped.”

Is that what we want?

Orwell’s wisdom suggests Trump was smart to raise the question of where all this is going. And to say: “You are changing history, you’re changing culture.”


https://nypost.com/2017/08/16/a-warning-from-george-orwell-on-the-monument-wars/
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
Winner Winner x 1 View List

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #48 on: July 02, 2020, 10:49:19 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2020/june/reflections-from-christian-scholar-on-social-justice-critic.html








Reflections from a Christian Scholar on Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical Ethics












Looking at Marxism and Critical Race Theory in light of the problem of racism in America.


During the weeks following the death of George Floyd, I have been following the news with an increasing sense of sadness and concern for the problems facing the United States regarding race and racism.

I’ve been unsure how to respond as I’ve scrolled through social media and watched increasingly polarized rhetoric on both sides of the political aisle—except to listen to the voices of Black friends and neighbors who are hurting and to pray for justice.

I’ve tried to apply the biblical principle of being “slow to speak” (James 1:19), but I’ve been convicted recently about joining a particular thread of the (inter)national conversation taking place among those who share my faith in Jesus Christ and want to support truth and justice without compromising on principles peculiar and integral to our faith—principles that they are afraid might be stealthily replaced by rhetoric from other, incompatible frameworks of thinking.

Two frameworks I’ve been hearing about increasingly often are familiar to me from my own field: Critical Race Theory and Marxism. Because I have some expertise in these areas, I want to offer some thoughts and, hopefully, clarification to the conversation.

I’ll begin by giving some credentials, not to ask for accolades but to indicate why I want to address these areas of the cultural conversation in particular. I have two English degrees (B.A. and M.A.) from a Christian university and a Ph.D. in literature and criticism from a state university.

In my field, Marxism is one of the most commonly studied and most influential perspectives, and Critical Race Theory is also a significant force and gaining momentum. As a result, I’ve studied these theories extensively.

What gives me an unusual perspective in my field, however, is the fact that my primary research interest—and the topic of my doctoral dissertation—is twentieth-century Russian literature. My studies have convinced me that the sufferings and deaths of millions are not only correlated with but largely caused by the Marxist-Leninist agenda, and I am therefore deeply opposed to Marxism as a framework.

I hope that, knowing this, those patient enough to read these notes will acquit me of being a closet Marxist covering a secular agenda with a veneer of Bible verses.

That said, I do believe that some reactions to the protests following the death of George Floyd in particular and the Black Lives Matter movement in general are based on a failure to recognize important nuances in the conversation.

I’m going to address what I believe to be some problematic reasoning I’m seeing come from Christian sources on race:

Argument #1: Like all sin, racism originates in the human heart. Therefore, the solution to racism is for people’s hearts to change. “Systemic racism,” on the other hand, is a Marxist idea.

Response: The first sentence’s claim is true. If you believe in original sin (Genesis 3, Romans 5), you have to admit that any sin originates in the human heart. Sin might be aggravated by circumstances, but circumstances don’t cause sin. However, the conclusion that the solution to racism is for people’s hearts to change is true but incomplete.

If people are born in sin and people build a society, that society will be structured in ways that reinforce whatever sins dominate the hearts of those who build it. Therefore, even if many people’s hearts change a few generations later, those structures might still perpetuate the problems associated with that society’s “original sins.”

This is why—and I believe this is an important distinction as well—it is possible to recognize that many individual police officers might not be racist and still believe that changes in police departments need to take place to discourage injustice.

What those changes might be—alterations in training, changes in criteria for which areas are patrolled more often, etc.—is an important conversation, but having it does not mean condemning all police officers, many of whom are no doubt grieved at the horrific actions of other officers, such as the murderer of George Floyd. The problem can be built into structures and (some) individual hearts.

Here is how the above arguments are distinct from Marxism:

Marxism posits that socio-economic forces create the problem, not that they perpetuate the problem. A true Marxist does not believe that individuals have essential selves apart from the historical contexts in which they develop.

As an atheistic philosophy, Marxism does not allow for belief in a soul, and therefore, people are merely the products of the world they live in (referred to as a “superstructure” of social norms, historical forces, religious ideas, etc.).

The way to change people is to change society, and, for those who follow the most progressive version of Marxism, to dismantle society and recreate it from the ground up (this is what Lenin tried to do in Russia and Mao Tsetung tried to do in China). I know people who hold to the most extreme version of this philosophy.

If you believe (as I do) that sin, such as racism, originates in the human heart and merely manifests itself in society, you can recognize the above project as fundamentally utopian. It won’t work because whatever society you build from scratch will still have problems (perhaps new ones, perhaps the same ones) because you won’t have fixed the source of the problems (the human heart).

Only one Person can eradicate sin from the world, and I pray for that Person’s coming with an increasing sense of urgency these days.

However, to reject the claim that “fixing society at the structural level will fix everything” does not mean that we should reject the idea of being good stewards of the society in which we live. The fact that we will never be able to eradicate sin (this side of the resurrection) does not mean we should sit back and allow it free reign.

Those among my fellow believers who oppose abortion are already recognizing that sin and its effects can be addressed on both individual and societal levels. Meeting with a desperate woman outside a clinic and convincing her not to end her baby’s life is addressing it at the individual level.

But many who reach out to prospective patients outside clinics also campaign for legal protections for the unborn and support clinics (like our local Blue Ridge Women’s Center) that provide desperate women with other options, resources, counseling, and support. Other systemic changes might involve better guarantees for parental leave, stronger incentives for paternal involvement or financial support, and funding for adoptive and social service venues.

Addressing the problem of abortion at the systemic level does not mean caving into Marxism unless we believe that doing so is the only, complete, and permanent solution.

I firmly believe that if we are to work toward racial reconciliation, we need to admit that the history of racism in the United States (slavery, Jim Crow, etc.) has left us with problems that need to be addressed at the heart level AND at the structural level.

Argument #2: Critical Race Theory is a Marxist framework, and therefore, it is antithetical to the gospel.

Response: Critical Race Theory is indeed deeply informed by Marxism. As a result, I recognize that, as a Christian scholar, I will not agree with all of its tenets. However—and bear in mind, this is coming from someone who wrote a dissertation about the ways in which Russian poets coped with Marxist-Leninist oppression—Marx was not wrong about absolutely everything. Very few thinkers are (probably because they are all made in God’s image) wrong about everything.

Here are two statements on which I, as a Christian scholar, actually agree with Marx—while vehemently rejecting his philosophy as a whole:

1) Power does exist, and people do sometimes use it to oppress others.

Reading the Old Testament will make these truths abundantly clear (Nebuchadnezzar, Pharaoh, the list goes on). And everyday experience makes these truths abundantly clear. Just ask anyone whose boss fired him/her for no good reason. Even Marx’s cited evidence for the above truths was legitimate. During the Industrial Revolution, factory workers had few legal protections, worked overly long hours in unsafe environments, and received few benefits and low pay.

2) Oppressed people do suffer, and their suffering is often unjust.

I actually believe that as a Christian, I have a much better foundation for supporting the above statement than Marx did. If people are merely cogs in the wheel of history, it’s hard to explain why anyone should care if they suffer. The fact that most Marxists I know are deeply compassionate people is, I believe, a testament to their humanity (being made in God’s image), not their philosophy.

Because I believe people are made in God’s image (Gen. 1); the God whom I worship warned his followers repeatedly not to oppress the poor, widows, foreigners, etc. (cf. Deut. 15:7 and countless other passages); and Jesus reached out to those whom society despised (women, Samaritans, etc.); I can argue with confidence that my faith is wholly consistent with working to mitigate oppression in the society in which I live.

By doing so, I am not embracing an alternate gospel but merely living in a way consistent with the gospel I have embraced since I was a child.

What some are referring to as “social justice” these days—making sure our laws and institutions don’t make it easier for the powerful to oppress marginalized groups—often refers to good, old-fashioned biblical justice.

This may mean that those who have more should be given structural incentives to share with those who have less. Ruth was able to pick up the grain from behind Boaz’s reapers because he was following the biblical mandate for them not to go back and pick up what they’d dropped—that was reserved for the poor and the immigrants. He could have argued that it all belonged to him, since he planted it, but he was willing to share.

Requiring him to give up every scrap of grain from his field to distribute it equally among the whole town would have been Marx’s solution, but requiring him to leave a little behind was God’s solution (Lev. 23:22).

Exactly how the principle of protecting the poor should be translated into legislation and cultural practices today is a separate question—one I’m not prepared to address here. Some incentives already exist (e.g., tax breaks for charitable donations). I’m merely pointing out that Christians who express concern about the disparity between the “haves” and “have nots” should not be labeled Marxists by other Christians on that criterion alone.

And if the term “social justice” is sometimes co-opted by Marxists, rejecting the concept outright robs Christians of the chance to become part of the conversation regarding its definition and application. It is a fluid concept right now, and using the term in a way that validates biblical principles of justice can help shape the way in which the cultural conversation develops.

Backing out of the conversation, on the other hand, involves relinquishing the chance to have what could be an important, positive influence.

Argument #3: The Black Lives Matter movement is Marxist and supportive of the LGBTQ community’s attempts to criminalize traditional, biblical views of sexuality.

Response: The official Black Lives Matter movement, started by Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi, is indeed built on a Marxist foundation and deeply involved with LGBTQ agendas. I took an entire doctoral-level cultural studies course on the Black Lives Matter movement, so I’m very aware of these connections.

However, as the course in question also involved a study of Twitter campaigns and hashtags (yes, people study Twitter in academia these days), I became just as aware that most people who use the #blacklivesmatter hashtag have no connection to the movement proper.

The hashtag itself speaks a truth, and people who hold up a sign at a protest proclaiming that truth are not necessarily involved with or even aware of the tenets of the movement proper. Conversations surrounding the Black Lives Matter protests should not assume that the slogan is owned by the movement (nor should the movement itself try to “own” all those who use the hashtag or the slogan).

I also believe that if Christians fail to become involved in promoting the truth behind the slogan, we are lending credence to the Marxist claim that Christianity exists merely to perpetuate the injustices it (Marxism) seeks to correct.

I think many of my fellow believers would be surprised how many people in my field are disgusted by our faith not because they believe we hold outdated ideas about God (though that’s a common belief as well) but because we’ve failed, so many times throughout history, to stand up for the oppressed.

My response to that disgust is that they’re not wrong about Christians having done the wrong thing at many times throughout history but that, when Christians have done the wrong thing, we’ve been acting in a way inconsistent with the tenets of our own faith. Because I believe that even Christians struggle with sin, I’m not surprised when I study history and read about my brothers and sisters having massive blind spots and acting accordingly (it makes me wonder what my own massive blind spots are).

But I do believe that those blind spots are just that—blind spots, areas in which they failed to see the truths of Scripture or understand how to apply them. When I see atrocities perpetrated by Lenin, Stalin, or Mao, however, I see the source of those atrocities built into their own philosophy and its assumption that creating a virtual paradise (a classless society) is possible and therefore worth achieving no matter what the cost.

Also, for the record, those in the LGBTQ community are highly sensitive that they not be left out of conversations involving justice for other marginalized groups. While I hold to a traditional, biblical view of sexuality that would offend many in the LGBTQ community, I do believe it is important that they be treated like the human beings they are, and I am willing to listen to them even if I will not agree with all of their claims.

There is a real fear among members of the LGBTQ community that they will suffer violence and dehumanization from others (and instances of such violence are well-documented).

As human beings, they deserve protection from those threats. Conversations over the distinction between disagreement and dehumanization are difficult because they involve questions regarding identity categories, but I hope and pray that such conversations can still happen.

Argument #4: The concept of “white privilege” is unjust because it blames white people today for atrocities, such as slavery or segregation, that were set up generations ago and that they had no hand in creating. It also suggests that white people today should feel guilty for racism even if they are not racists themselves.

Response: Some people probably do use the term “white privilege” in this way (the conversation is developing at such a rapid pace that such terminology is developing new shades of meaning at an accelerated rate). However, the term is helpful in describing a real phenomenon—one that I’ve personally witnessed taking place. Bear with me, and I’ll define it first, then share a personal story to illustrate what I mean.

“White privilege” refers to the phenomenon in which white people receive certain societal benefits that they did not earn—benefits they receive by default simply for being white.

To be clear, I do not feel guilty for being born white. I was created that way, and it’s no more a sin to be born white than it is to be born a member of any other race.

However, I do recognize that some people—and some institutions—will respond to me differently because I am white. I do not, for example, get followed around department stores by loss-prevention officers because I look like “the kind of person who might steal something.” My Black friends do have that happen to them.

This is where the term “privilege” gets sticky, because it can be understood to mean I have a benefit that I shouldn’t have—i.e., that we should both be followed around the store. Actually, however, what I’m receiving is the benefit of the doubt—the default assumption that I’m going to be honest until I do or say something to undermine that assumption.

What the concept of privilege actually suggests is that we should both get the benefit of the doubt. It is not a privilege because I shouldn’t have it; it is a privilege because I have it and other people just as honest as I am do not have it. The term, in this context, calls attention to an unjust and illogical disparity in expectations.

Now, how should I respond? Should I feel guilty for the racism informing the tendencies of loss-prevention officers to target customers other than me for surveillance?

I shouldn’t feel the guilt of being individually culpable for what other people do. After all, I didn’t ask the loss-prevention officers to follow other people around. However, I should feel guilty if I recognize the larger problem at work here—both individual and systemic racism—and do nothing about it.

I can’t fix it single-handedly, but I can speak up. I can vote. I can teach texts in my classroom that confront these issues. I can say something when a white friend tells a racist joke. I can listen to my friends of color when they share their experiences and allow myself to be guided by their insight. If I don’t, I’m part of the problem and share the guilt of perpetuating it (even though I didn’t personally cause it).

I might also feel other emotions, such as anger, which is a proper response to injustice. This is, in fact, exactly what I felt when I visited the local social security office to get an updated card after my wedding thirteen years ago.

My sister, a Korean-American adopted at three-months-old and naturalized as an American citizen in early childhood, had gotten married to her husband in the same ceremony. She, being more on top of things than I was, had already gone to the office to get her card. She had taken the required documents listed on the website—birth certificate, current social security card, a photo ID, etc. When she arrived at the office and showed her papers, however, they demanded more: they wanted to see other papers, records, etc. that were not officially required when she already had a valid social security card.

I remember them demanding that she make several trips to their office—I even remember hearing that they wanted to make her take a test in American history (because all real Americans apparently know their history so well). Finally, she got the card.

Having heard about all the hoops they had made her jump through, I was nervous about going to get my card. I double-checked that I had everything—birth certificate, social security card, photo ID, etc.

When I got to the window, I handed over my current card and said I was there to get an updated card with my new name. The woman behind the counter handed it to me without even asking to see my driver’s license.

When I got back to my car, I called my sister and ranted about what racist jerks ran the social security office and how outraged I was on her behalf. I probably felt a little self-righteous, if I’m honest, for my outrage, and I do believe I was right to feel the outrage. I shouldn’t have felt so righteous, though.

A more righteous person would have walked back inside and asked to speak to the employee’s supervisor. Maybe I wasn’t a racist, but I didn’t do anything to challenge racism when it hit me in the face, and so, notwithstanding my righteous anger, I failed to do the right thing because I don’t like confrontations.

I hope and pray that, given the injustices on national news these days, I will do the right thing the next time I get a chance to. It’s why I’m writing this essay-length note, knowing full well that my Marxist friends (if they take the time to read it) will not appreciate my objections to their philosophy and that some of my Christian friends (if they take the time to read it) will see me as selling out.

I want to do the right thing this time, though, and so I’m doing my best to add to a difficult conversation. I welcome any and all honest responses, whether they agree with me or not. There are important questions being raised about issues that directly and/or indirectly affect my brothers and sisters in Christ—and my friends of other faiths and no faith who share similar concerns about justice.

So I’ll end my long reflections by saying, on or off social media, let’s talk.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #50 on: July 17, 2020, 09:46:53 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2020/july-web-only/perils-of-white-american-folk-religion.html








The Perils of White American Folk Religion














Many Christians unwittingly practice a counter-faith that doesn't know how to deal with racism.


In June, 2020, Dan Cathy, the CEO of Chick-fil-A; Louie Giglio, pastor of Passion City Church; and Lecrae, a platinum-selling recording artist, gathered to discuss the tortuous death of George Floyd, choked by officer Derek Chauvin, who put his knee on the unarmed man’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. They gathered to talk about Ahmaud Arbery, who was chased down by armed residents, surrounded, and shot to death in Glynn County, Georgia, on February 23. A potential cover-up protected the murderers.

After Rayshard Brooks was killed by police in the drive-thru of an Atlanta Wendy’s, Cathy, Giglio, and Lecrae sat together to talk about racism and the church’s role. Over 60 percent of white Christians think pastors should not talk about race. Forty percent believe race and immigration should never even be a topic in church. Meanwhile, an equal number of black folks say that pastors and churches should. This shows that racial reconciliation conferences do not work. Before reconciliation can be introduced, we have to embrace the truth.

In the aftermath of terrible state violence in other countries, truth and reconciliation commissions convened to bring reparative, restorative, or punitive justice. This happened in Rwanda after the 1994 genocide, in South Africa after the fall of apartheid, and after what is termed the “Dirty War” in Argentina. This has never happened in the United States.

These secular governments understand a fundamental reality that should be familiar to followers of Jesus: We confess and God forgives. Truth and acknowledgement come before reconciliation. Christians of every color should have a firm, biblical grasp of the necessity for individual and collective confession and repentance before forgiveness and reconciliation can occur.

When we trespass, we must wrestle with the gravity of personal and corporate sins—including sinful actions we were not even aware of, injustices we benefit from, and results that we did not intend. We must lament, confess, and repent (Acts 2:38; 3:19). Only then are we truly reconciled to God through Christ Jesus and sent, equipped, to be ministers of reconciliation to others (2 Cor. 5:18).

In well-resourced, often white evangelical churches, entire ministries and parachurch organizations disciple people out of patterns of sin, struggles with alcoholism, and drug addiction. Ministries serve those in need while reinforcing their personal dignity and value. But such compassion toward sinners and the needy gets lost once the topic turns to white supremacy.

White Christians and those pursuing whiteness often become defensive and angry when asked what Jesus would say about the race-, class-, gender- and ideologically based hierarchy evident in our world. The inability and unwillingness to acknowledge and confess what exists and repent creates conditions for violence and oppression against people of color. Our country and its churches are socialized to not critique white supremacy.

The church has been instrumental in the creation, defense, and propagation of the myth of whiteness under the reign of White Jesus. Jemar Tisby, author of the best-selling The Color of Compromise: The Truth About the American Church’s Complicity in Racism, lays out clear and searing connections between the enslavement of Africans and leaders of white congregations. “Many of the men who conducted night rides” that terrorized black communities with burned crosses and lynchings were the very same men who “ascended to pulpits to preach on Sunday.”

Go back further, detailing how 15th-century church edicts exalted those with lighter skin and rejected the personhood of those with darker skin. A series of Roman Catholic decrees (the Doctrine of Discovery, 1493) codified white supremacy and sanctioned genocide, rape and abuse against African and Native peoples. Theologian Willie Jennings asserted the purpose was to bring people and the planet to “maturity.”

Colonialism created a counter-faith I call White American Folk Religion (WAFR). It’s a set of beliefs and practices grounded in a race, class, gender, and ideological hierarchy that segregates and ranks all people under a light-skinned, thin-lipped, blond-haired Christ. Americans of every color and racial assignment must reckon with the current and historic reality of a country and its churches rooted in White American Folk Religion. WAFR fuels ignorance, complicity, and willing participation in the patterns of injustice that perpetuate the death and degradation of brown, black, and indigenous women and men. Yet, in this moment of racial turmoil, those entangled in WAFR believe it is their right and responsibility to speak, teach, and lead.

In our post-colonial world, and especially in the United States, Western seminaries and theology prioritize whiteness and defer to white men like Giglio and Cathy—evangelical, older, white, wealthy, well-known, well-educated, well-connected, able-bodied, and gainfully employed—and regard them as credible and trustworthy, though neither Giglio nor Cathy is an expert on American policing or the history of a racism that promotes mass incarceration and instinctively perceives black bodies as criminal in every community. Neither of them has done the inner work to decolonize and disempower their frames of WAFR reference. They were not chosen to lead this dialogue in front of cameras and congregants in a crisis because of their experience or expertise but because they fit the description of authority.

There are many leaders who could have led this dialogue with clarity, conviction, and compassion and who are already leading Christ-centered, Holy Spirit–filled movements. They were passed over in favor of these, like too many in the white church and of the world, who speak lies from the pit of hell about how slavery is a “white blessing” from their Christ in their stained glass windows.

Colonialism succeeded. Racism is pervasive—so much so that we are often unaware of the depths of our socialized sin and individual participation. Giglio apologized on Instagram and asked for prayer. What he did not do was confess how his seminary training and discipleship did not prepare him to lead in this moment; that he is stepping down and stepping back to make space for the women and men of color to lead this conversation; and that he will take their direction. Often, white Christians are not willing to believe, let alone follow, people of color or rigorously engage in the process of detangling the Jesus of scripture from WAFR. This is what the work of decolonization looks like.

Pastors of every color in Giglio’s position must acknowledge that western theology and praxis are intertwined with WAFR and confess where they lack the personal and institutional wisdom to comprehensively resist white supremacy. Church leaders that are ill-equipped to lead and teach on issues of ethnic justice and reconciliation should confess their limitations and empower leaders of color to shepherd them and their congregants towards the Acts 2 community of true fellowship and wonder and unity and prayer (Acts 2:42–44). In the face of certain backlash, pastors must do more than denounce racism. Christians need to be discipled out of prejudice, bias, and WAFR. This begins with white pastors confessing complicity in racist systems and testifying to God’s grace and forgiveness in their own lives; then they can lead others to do the same.

How amazing it would be if pastors and leaders who benefit from the racism in their families and institutions repented for not resisting racist actions, ideology, and theology? What if pastors repented publicly for not rejecting the curse of Ham, not standing up for the Japanese during internment, or participating in white flight because people of color moved into “their” neighborhoods? What if parents asked for forgiveness from God and their children for saying, “You can marry anyone but one of them”? What if Christian families and institutions quantified their benefits from slavery and genocide of native peoples and allocated money toward financial reparation? This would be profound, powerful, and beyond significant for people of color. White people too would be liberated from the false burden of superiority, the lie of white supremacy, and enter into the desegregated, reconciled family of God. No more statements, panel discussions, conferences, or book clubs; what we need is lament, confession, repentance, and a refusal to conform to the world’s racist patterns. Jesus prayed in John 17 that we might all be one and preview the coming “great multitude that no one could count, from every nation, tribe, people and language, standing before the throne and before the Lamb” (Rev. 7:9–17). We can experience a slice of this future on this side of heaven if, as the body of Christ, we embrace truth and reconciliation in the United States.








Jonathan Walton is the author of Twelve Lies That Hold America Captive: And the Truth That Sets Us Free. He is also an area director for InterVarsity NY/NJ focusing on spiritual formation and experiential discipleship. He is from Southern Virginia and lives in New York City.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: GEORGE FLOYD - Riots Go Nationwide
« Reply #51 on: July 18, 2020, 08:13:24 pm »
Car delivers baseball bats in front of City Hall for "peaceful protesters" on the Brooklyn Bridge.
Jul 16, 2020


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlNi4tsGUj4
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
Sad Sad x 1 View List

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
3 Replies
2756 Views
Last post August 28, 2020, 03:12:44 pm
by patrick jane
26 Replies
4302 Views
Last post August 29, 2020, 10:50:51 am
by patrick jane

+-Recent Topics

Being saved... by patrick jane
Today at 01:09:25 pm

CORONAVIRUS - THE PALE HORSE by Bladerunner
Today at 09:27:26 am

Black Spring With Autumn Political Commentary by patrick jane
Today at 12:56:27 am

Freemasons, Jesuits, Illuminati & Lucifer Worship by patrick jane
Today at 12:17:12 am

End Times - Tracking The Signs by patrick jane
Today at 12:17:01 am

Revelation - Last Days by patrick jane
Today at 12:16:16 am

NEW WORLD ORDER SYMBOLS & MEANINGS by ODD TV by patrick jane
Today at 12:15:44 am

Hollywood Occult Symbolism and Conspiracy by patrick jane
Today at 12:15:32 am

Aethereal - Battle for Heaven and Earth by patrick jane
Today at 12:14:50 am

Conspiracy - NWO, NASA and More by patrick jane
Today at 12:14:36 am

Child Abuse Is Not Funny by truthjourney
September 25, 2020, 11:52:56 pm

Trump 2020 - Winning !!! by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:52:02 pm

Politics Today by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:51:51 pm

Re: Trump 2020 - Winning !!! by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:51:25 pm

Re: Politics Today by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:50:52 pm

Creepy Joe Biden by truthjourney
September 25, 2020, 11:30:10 pm

Ministry On Video by Lion Of Judah by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 10:29:03 pm

WALT DISNEY THE PERVERT OCCULTIST by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 10:19:01 pm