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Author Topic: Time? What is it? How does it work? Is there existence without it?  (Read 4217 times)

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patrick jane

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Time is up

time is the 4th dimension as we see in the bible. The Bible suggest 11 dimensions and our scientist agree. God stands outside of time, We are 3 dimensional yet we enjoy one third of the time dimension, the past.

we can measure time and the smallest is 10 to the minus forty-third power. Called a "Plank time" It is the time it takes light traveling at 186,000 mi/hour to travel from the cornea of the eye tor the retina.

Time started on earth when GOD said let there be light. until then the earth was in darkness. Time has to have some way to be measured and with the creation of light to hide the darkness every 12 hours, there would be no time.

Experiments have been performed with a person was placed in a room devoid of light, sound, etc. with the only mention of time being the dinner bell (delivery of food) which occurred at different hours.  The person lost their mind.

We (our Fleshly body) needs time to function yet except for the plank time (our present time) , we judge our time by the Past.

God on the other hand is beyond time in so many ways. The Bible not only tells us this through Idioms, but shows us this in its scripture.

Our bodies will be like Him, Bodies of Light for we can see him. Thus what ever dimensions He enjoys, it appears we will enjoy them as well including being Outside of time.


Blade
So I guess time requires memory because without memories of the past only the present and the future could be experienced, but not remembered.
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patrick jane

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Time is up

time is the 4th dimension as we see in the bible. The Bible suggest 11 dimensions and our scientist agree. God stands outside of time, We are 3 dimensional yet we enjoy one third of the time dimension, the past.

we can measure time and the smallest is 10 to the minus forty-third power. Called a "Plank time" It is the time it takes light traveling at 186,000 mi/hour to travel from the cornea of the eye tor the retina.

Time started on earth when GOD said let there be light. until then the earth was in darkness. Time has to have some way to be measured and with the creation of light to hide the darkness every 12 hours, there would be no time.

Experiments have been performed with a person was placed in a room devoid of light, sound, etc. with the only mention of time being the dinner bell (delivery of food) which occurred at different hours.  The person lost their mind.

We (our Fleshly body) needs time to function yet except for the plank time (our present time) , we judge our time by the Past.

God on the other hand is beyond time in so many ways. The Bible not only tells us this through Idioms, but shows us this in its scripture.

Our bodies will be like Him, Bodies of Light for we can see him. Thus what ever dimensions He enjoys, it appears we will enjoy them as well including being Outside of time.


Blade
So I guess time requires memory because without memories of the past only the present and the future could be experienced, but not remembered.
Yes
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patrick jane

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Time Manipulation and Space-Time Theory - ROBERT SEPEHR


Albert Einstein concluded that the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. Is time travel possible? Has anyone built a successful time machine? What classified German UFO technology does the US government posses, and can they manipulate space-time? Is there a Secret Space Program?

18 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-HswUSsAFA

patrick jane

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81VxXEIBnnU


THIS IS STRANGER THAN I THOUGHT


Not sure how I missed some of these connections the first time I investigated this, but they are too mind blowing to ignore right before the November 3rd election. Most of you know that I'm not into politics, but I still find this could possibly paint a picture as to where the crazy script that's unfolding comes from.

The sequel to the Book "The Last President" speaks of demons, giants, and the under world, which I briefly cover here and I feel there is something to that. Could be wrong and not saying this is prophetic in any way or that time travel is real, but there is an obvious plan and I don't trust the plan. It's important to truth the Father only and lean not on our own understanding.

« Last Edit: October 07, 2021, 09:50:00 am by patrick jane »

patrick jane

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Maximus the Confessor’s ‘
Aeon



https://www.academia.edu/21527248/Maximus_the_Confessors_Aeon_as_a_Distinct_Mode_of_Temporality


 as a Distinct Mode of Temporality
Dr Sotiris Mitralexis University of Winchester & City University of Istanbul
Abstract: In this paper, I shall focus on the semantic content of
α
 in Maximus the Confessor

s works, particularly in the instances in which he employs it as a distinct form of temporality, i.e. not as simply meaning
‘ἷtἷὄὀity’
. I focus on
α
 as aMaximian
terminus technicus
 in spite of the diverse meanings that he himself ascribes to the word in certain cases
.
 I will also
ἷὀgagἷ with thἷ ὅtatuὅ ὁἸ timἷ aὅ humaὀity’ὅ
slavery
, aὅ humaὀity’ὅ
enemy
 
iὀ εaximuὅ’ thὁught,
for this is integrally connected with the notion of the Aeon and especially with the need to transcend both time as

 and temporality in the form of the Aeon in striving for ever well-being. The greater context of this investigation is the understanding
ὁἸ εaximuὅ’
conception of temporality as a
threefold
one, consisting of (a) time as

, the temporality of the sensible realm and the numbering of motion, (b)
α
 i.e.
thἷ χἷὁὀ, a ‘timἷ withὁut mὁvἷmἷὀt’ aὀἶ thἷ tἷmpὁὄality ὁἸ thἷ iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ ἵὄἷa
tion, and(c) the transformed temporality of the ever-moving repose (

 
ἀ
).
Maximus the Confessor is widely credited with accomplishing a philosophical and theological synthesis of rare depth and fecundity. Among the numerous fields (as we would divide them to today) in which his contributions bear relevance are ontology, cosmology, and philosophical/theological anthropology, to name a few. However, not adequate attention has been given to his complex and nuanced understanding of temporality, despite a number of contributions shedding light to aspects of this subject and to which I shall refer below. It is my
ἵὁὀviἵtiὁὀ that a thὄἷἷἸὁlἶ thἷὁὄy ὁἸ tἷmpὁὄality ἵaὀ ἴἷ tὄaἵἷἶ iὀ εaximuὅ’ wὁὄkὅ
, a theory that, in its threefold structure, has a noticeable degree of originality in spite of the Confessor building on diverse elements from the thought of his predecessors and contemporaries in order to arrive at this synthesis.
1
 This conception of temporality consists of (a) time as

,the temporality of the sensible realm and the numbering of motion, (b)
α
 i.e. the Aeon, a
‘timἷ withὁut mὁvἷmἷὀt’ aὀἶ thἷ tἷmpὁὄality ὁἸ thἷ iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ ἵὄἷatiὁὀ, aὀἶ (ἵ) thἷ
transformed temporality of the ever-moving repose (

 
ἀ
2
) that is both absolute timelessness and the temporality of deification, the consummation of the very nature of time
 —
having thus implications for a number of theological and philosophical subjects beyond temporality itself.
IἸ wἷ uὀἶἷὄὅtaὀἶ εaximuὅ’ ἵὁὀἵἷptiὁὀ ὁἸ tἷmpὁὄalit
y this way, then the ambiguous
α
 cannot be accurately rendered as
‘ἷtἷὄὀity’ iὀ ἷaἵh aὀἶ ἷvἷὄy ἵaὅἷ, aὅ thἷὄἷ wὁulἶ ἴἷ
two
 
kiὀἶὅ ὁἸ ‘ἷtἷὄὀity’ with ἶiἸἸἷὄἷὀt ἵhaὄaἵtἷὄiὅtiἵὅέ Iὀ thiὅ papἷὄ, I ὅhall Ἰὁἵuὅ ὁὀ thἷ ὅἷmaὀtiἵ
content of
α
 
iὀ εaximuὅ’ wὁὄkὅ
 
in the instances in which he employs it as a distinct form of temporality
; I shall focus on
α
 as a Maximian
terminus technicus
 in spite of the diverse meanings that he himself ascribes to the word in certain cases
.
 This polysemy in the
1
 Analyzed extensively in Sotiris Mitralexis,
 Ever-Moving Repose: The notion of time in Maximus the
Confessor’s philosophy through the perspective of a relational ontology
 
(ἐἷὄliὀμ όὄἷiἷ Uὀivἷὄὅität ἐἷὄliὀ, ἢhϊ
diss., 2014). Chapter III.5. is devoted to the
ὅtuἶy ὁἸ εaximuὅ’ α
 and formed the basis for the present paper.
2
 E.g. Maximus Confessor,
Quaestiones ad Thalassium II. Quaestiones LVI-LXV
, eds. Carl Laga & Carlos Steel Corpus Christianorum Series Graeca 22 (Turnhout: Brepols, 1990), 65.544-6 for this ambiguous notion


ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄ’ὅ uὅἷ ὁἸ wὁὄἶὅ wὁulἶ ὀὁt ἴἷ aὀ ἷxἵἷptiὁὀ, ἴut ὄathἷὄ a vἷὄy ἵhaὄaἵtἷὄiὅtiἵ
topos.
 I
will alὅὁ ἴὄiἷἸly mἷὀtiὁὀ thἷ ὅtatuὅ ὁἸ timἷ aὅ humaὀity’ὅ
slavery
, aὅ humaὀity’ὅ
enemy
 in
εaximuὅ’ thὁught, Ἰὁὄ thiὅ iὅ iὀtἷgὄally ἵὁὀὀἷἵtἷ
d with the notion of the Aeon and especially with the need to transcend both time as

 and temporality in the form of the Aeon in striving for ever well-being (
ἀ
 
ὖ
 
α)έ Thuὅ iὅ εaximuὅ’ thὄἷἷἸὁlἶ tἷmpὁὄality ἶiὅἵlὁὅἷἶ
not merely as an idea of exclusively ontological and cosmological relevance, but as crucial for
thἷ ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄ’ὅ aὀthὄὁpὁlὁgy aὅ wἷll
, to which I will hint towards the end of this paper.
Whilἷ εaximuὅ’ ὀὁtiὁὀ ὁἸ thἷ χἷὁὀ (α
)
3
 as a distinct, second form of temporality is expounded in specific passages of his work, the reader is faced with the problem of
εaximuὅ’ ἶiἸἸἷὄἷὀt uὅagἷ ὁἸ thἷ tἷὄm α
 in different contexts throughout the Maximian corpus.
4
 Apart from the meaning illustrated in the dual definition of

 and
α
 in
 Ambigua
 (PG 91 1164 BC), which will be shown as the primary definition of the Aeon, Maximus also uses the term in different contexts in order to signify eternity as unlimited duration,
5
 or a great amount of time/a century,
6
 
ὁὄ hiὅtὁὄy, ὁὄ ύὁἶ’ὅ tἷmpὁὄality
 in contrast to our own
7
 etc. This becomes quite pronounced in instances where Maximus uses the word
3
 
χὅ wἷ pὁiὀtἷἶ ὁut iὀ thἷ ἴἷgiὀὀiὀg, a pὄὁἴlἷm with maὀy ὅἵhὁlaὄly aἵἵὁuὀtὅ ὁἸ εaximuὅ’ uὀἶἷὄὅtaὀἶiὀg ὁἸ thἷχἷὁὀ iὅ thἷ laἵk ὁἸ ἶiἸἸἷὄἷὀtiatiὁὀ ἴἷtwἷἷὀ thἷ ‘ἷtἷὄὀity’ ὁἸ thἷ χἷὁὀ aὀἶ thἷ ‘ἷtἷὄὀity’ ὁἸ thἷ ἷvἷὄ
-moving repose, r
ἷὅultiὀg iὀ aὀ ἷὄὄὁὀἷὁuὅ aὀἶ iὀἵὁmplἷtἷ ὄἷaἶiὀg ὁἸ thἷ ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄέ ώὁwἷvἷὄ, ἢaul ἢlaὅὅ’ aὄtiἵlἷ‘Tὄaὀὅἵἷὀἶἷὀt Timἷ iὀ εaximuὅ thἷ ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄ’,
The Thomist
 44:2 (1980), pp. 259-77, is a valuable
ἵὁὀtὄiἴutiὁὀέ ἠὁtἷ ἢlaὅὅ’ mἷὀtiὁὀ ὁἸ thἷ εaximiaὀ aὀἶ ἑappaἶὁἵia
n notion of
α
 (distance, interval, extension) and its relation to temporality in p. 260, as this plays a major role in our treatment of the subject.
ἢlaὅὅ’ aὄtiἵlἷ ‘Tὄaὀὅἵἷὀἶἷὀt Timἷ aὀἶ Etἷὄὀity iὀ ύὄἷgὁὄy ὁἸ ἠyὅὅa’,
Vigiliae Christianae
 34 (1980), pp. 180-92,
iὅ a gὁὁἶ iὀtὄὁἶuἵtiὁὀ tὁ thἷὅἷ ἵὁὀἵἷptὅ pὄiὁὄ tὁ εaximuὅ’ ὄἷὀἷwal ὁἸ thἷmμ iὀ ἴὁth aὄtiἵlἷὅ, ἢlaὅὅ’
contradistinction of the Neoplatonic understanding of eternity and return to the biblical and patristic one is particularly noteworthy. David
ἐὄaἶὅhaw’ὅ ‘Timἷ aὀἶ Etἷὄὀity iὀ thἷ ύὄἷἷk όathἷὄὅ’,
The Thomist
 70 (2006), pp.311-366, contains a very interesting subchapter on Maximus, but heavily depends on the
Scholia
to the Dionysian Corpus, which are now attributed to Maximus only to a very limited extent and cannot be relied on for
iὀvἷὅtigatiὀg εaximuὅ’ viἷwὅέ
 
4
 Which, to different degrees, is also the case with almost any important term Maximus employs, making it
ἷxἵἷἷἶiὀgly ἶiἸἸiἵult Ἰὁὄ thἷ ὄἷaἶἷὄ tὁ ὅquaὄἷly ὅyὅtἷmatiὐἷ thἷ ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄ’ὅ uὀἶἷὄ
standing of core notions such as

,
π
 (mode) etc. Throughout the secondary literature concerning Maximus, an abundance of attempts at systematizing Maximian terminology can be found (instead, for example, of accepting the fact that only
approaches
 
tὁ εaximuὅ’ thὁught ἵaὀ ἴἷ attἷmptἷἶ, withὁut ἵlaimὅ ὁἸ ἶἷἸiὀitivἷ aὀὅwἷὄὅ), ὁἸtἷὀ yiἷlἶiὀguὀὅatiὅἸaἵtὁὄy ὄἷὅultὅ aὀἶ lἷaἶiὀg tὁ miὅuὀἶἷὄὅtaὀἶiὀgὅ ὁἸ thἷ ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄ’ὅ tἷaἵhiὀgὅ—
 a tendency that is gradually being corrected.
5
 E.g. Maximus the Confessor,
 Quaestiones ad Thalassium I. Quaestiones I-LV,
eds. Carl Laga & Carlos Steel,Corpus Christianorum Series Graeca 7 (Turnhout: Brepols, 1980), 38.52:

6
 E.g.
Quaestiones ad Thalassium II
, 56.140-2:
 


7
 Maximus the Confessor,
On Difficulties in the Church Fathers: The Ambigua
, ed. and trans. Nicholas Constas,Vol. I, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 28 (Cambridge, MA and London, 2014), p. 309, which is also PG91,
11κκἐμ ‘It muὅt ἴἷ aἵἵἷptἷἶ that thἷ ἷtἷὄὀally ἷxiὅtiὀg ύὁἶ [
 
ἀ
 
] …’έ Siὀἵἷ ἑὁὀὅtaὅ’ ἵὄitiἵal ἷἶitiὁὀ(vὁlέ I aὀἶ II aὄἷ ϊumἴaὄtὁὀ ἡakὅ εἷἶiἷval δiἴὄaὄy βκ aὀἶ βλ ὄἷὅpἷἵtivἷly) ὀamἷὅ εigὀἷ’ὅ
Patrologia Graeca
 column of ea
ἵh ὄἷὅpἷἵtivἷ paὅὅagἷ, whilἷ maὀy ὅἵhὁlaὄὅ ὅtill ἶἷpἷὀἶ ὁὀ ἢύ’ὅ
 Ambigua
, wἷ will uὅἷ ἑὁὀὅtaὅ’
critically edited text while simply citing
 Ambigua
 
with ἢύλ1 ἵὁlumὀὅ Ἰὁὄ thἷ ὄἷaἶἷὄὅ’ ἵὁὀvἷὀiἷὀἵἷ, aὅ ἢύἵὁlumὀὅ ἵaὀ ἴἷ ἷaὅily tὄaἵἷἶ ἴaἵk tὁ ἑὁὀὅtaὅ’ pagἷὅ, whil
e the opposite is naturally not the case. When directly
uὅiὀg ἑὁὀὅtaὅ’ tὄaὀὅlatiὁὀ, wἷ will ἵitἷ ἑὁὀὅtaὅ’ pagἷ ὀumἴἷὄὅέ Sἷἷ alὅὁ
Scholia in De Divinis Nominibus
,CD4.1 and PG4 229 A-C:

Aeon
 meaning eternity in the sense of unlimited time by employing the word in its plural form
α
, i.e. the ages.
8
 Maximus differentiates between the singular,
α
, and the plural,
α
, in a way suggestive of this by employing both forms in the same sentence with different meanings
9
 —
but again, this is not characteristic of the whole of his work and cannot be systematized in such a way. When speaking o
Ἰ thἷ ‘tἷmpὁὄality’ ὁἸ ύὁἶ iὀ ἵὁὀtὄaὅt tὁ ὁuὄ
own, Maximus sometimes refers to it as Aeon or aeonic and sometimes as
ἀΐ, ἀΐ,ἀ,
10
 
iὀ ὁὄἶἷὄ tὁ ἵὁὀtὄaὅt ύὁἶ’ὅ ‘tἷmpὁὄality’ tὁ thἷ χἷὁὀ aὅ wἷll
11
 —
however, the Confessor does not adopt a systematized distinction of

 /
α
 /
ἀ
, whereas he often clarifies that no kind of temporality whatsoever can be applicable to God. And (to make things worse) there are passages in which Maximus refers to
ἀ
 simply as eternity without change and alteration,
12
 practically equating it with the Aeon (as the state of
tἷmpὁὄality ὁἸ iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ ὄἷalitiἷὅ aὀἶ ‘timἷ withὁut mὁtiὁὀ’) aὀἶ ἷὄaἶiἵatiὀg aὀy hὁpἷ ὁἸ a
solid

 /
α
 /
ἀ
 distinction. However, and apart from this variety in the use of terms, Maximus
does
 propose a second form of temporality beyond normal time (

) and its extensions in duration
(ἷxtἷὀὅiὁὀὅ that ὄἷaἵh up tὁ thἷ ‘agἷὅ ὁἸ thἷ agἷὅ’)έ χ Ἰὁὄm ὁἸ tἷmpὁὄality that iὅ
inverted time
, as it is time without motion
 —
whereas the main characteristic of time is that it is the numbering of motion. I
. Quite logically, due to the numerous different commentators that authored the
 Scholia,
 the differences in the use of the terms
α
 and
α
 throughout the
Scholia
 can be profound, often offering contradictory illustrations thereof.
8
 E.g.
 Ambigua,
1βηβ έ
 
9
 
 Ambigua,
 
1γκλ ϊμ α 
 
α
 
, α
 
αα α
 
αα
.
10
 E.g. Maximus the Confessor,
Capita de caritate
, in Aldo Ceresa-Gastaldo (ed.),
 Massimo Confessore -
Capitoli sulla caritá. Ed. criticamente con introd., versione e note
, Verba Seniorum, collana di testi e studipatristici, n.s. 3 (Rome: Ed. Studium, 1963), 2.27.3, as well as 4.3.1:

 
ἀυ
 
υ
 
 π
 

 
Θ
. As mentioned earlier, Maximus attributes
ἀ
 to the uncreated

 (
Capita de caritate
, 1.100, 2.27), thus differentiating
ἀ
 from the Aeon, the beings in whom had had a beginning and a generation, while the

 had not.
11
 
Iὀ εaximuὅ’
Capita theologica et oeconomica
 (located in PG90, 1084-1173), PG90 1086 B
 ,
1.6, we find a clear example of the
ἀΐ
 attributed to God and the Aeon attributed to the creatures that are not under time:
 ‘χἴὅὁlutἷly ὀὁthiὀg that iὅ ἶiἸἸἷὄἷὀt Ἰὄὁ
m [God] by substance is seen together with him from all eternity [

 
ἀυ
]: neither the Aeon, nor time, nor anything dwelling in them
’, tὄaὀὅlέ ύἷὁὄgἷ ἑέ
Berthold,
 Maximus the Confessor: Selected Writings
 (New York: Paulist Press, 1985), p. 130. And:
 Ambigua,
11κκ ἐμ ‘[ύὁἶ] iὅ thἷ ἵὄἷatὁὄ aὀἶ Ἰaὅhiὁὀἷὄ ὁἸ ἷvἷὄy agἷ [α
] and time along with everything that exists in them. Yet [one] will not conclude from this that any of these things has in any way existed together with God from eternity [

 
ἀυ
], for [one] knows that it is impossible for either of two eternally coexisting [
 ἀυ] pὄiὀἵiplἷὅ tὁ ἴἷ thἷ ἵauὅἷ ὁἸ thἷ ὁthἷὄ’ (tὄaὀὅlέ ἑὁὀὅtaὅ, vὁlέ I, pέ γίλ)έ
12
 E.g.
 Ambigua,
11ἄλ ϊμ ‘it iὅ ὀὁt pὁὅὅiἴlἷ, ὀὁὄ ὄatiὁὀally ἵὁhἷὄἷὀt, tὁ ἵὁὀὅiἶἷὄ aὅ ἷt
ernal that which is not always the same [

 

 
ὡα
 
ἔ
 
ἀ
], nor immune from change and alteration, but instead is scattered and
ἵhaὀgἷἶ iὀ a myὄiaἶ ὁἸ wayὅ’ (tὄaὀὅlέ ἑὁὀὅtaὅ, vὁlέ I, pέ βἅἅ)έ



 
 Draft
 —
 please do not cite. Final version in The Heythrop Journal: DOI: 10.1111/heyj.12319
transformation of the temporality in which that person is operating. Contemplating the

 while being in the temporality of

 would not make sense in a Maximian framework: a(seeming)
cessation of motion
 would be necessary, a
time devoid of motion
; the participation in the Aeon, i.e. the temporality of the intelligible realm. Our conclusion is that, from the perspective of theological anthropology, the Aeon as
εaximuὅ’ ὅἷἵὁὀἶ mὁἶἷ ὁἸ tἷmpὁὄality wὁulἶ ἴἷ iὀἶiὅpἷὀὅaἴlἷ Ἰὁὄ hiὅ ὁvἷὄall ἵὁὀἵἷpt
ion to
havἷ philὁὅὁphiἵal ἵὁhἷὄἷὀἵἷέ ώumaὀity’ὅ aὅἵἷὀt Ἰὄὁm thἷ ὅlavἷὄy ὁἸ timἷ tὁ thἷ ὄaἶiἵal
ontological freedom of deification and the ever-moving repose cannot be effected in a single
‘jump iὀ tἷmpὁὄalityήmὁtiὁὀ’έ χἷὁὀiἵ tἷmpὁὄality wὁulἶ ἴἷ a lὁgiἵal
and necessary stage between these extreme realities of the human person. From the sensible realm to the intelligible creation and then beyond createdness, to the uncreated God. From practical philosophy to natural contemplation and then to theological mystagogy. From time as

 
tὁ thἷ χἷὁὀ’ὅ ἵἷὅὅatiὁὀ ὁἸ mὁtiὁὀ aὀἶ ἴἷyὁὀἶ, tὁ thἷ ἷxaltἷἶ 
 
ἀ
. The Aeon is
thuὅ ἶiὅἵlὁὅἷἶ aὅ thἷ ἴaὅiὅ Ἰὁὄ thἷ ὄἷaliὅm aὀἶ ἵὁhἷὄἷὀἵἷ ὁἸ εaximuὅ’ thἷὁlὁgiἵal viὅiὁὀ ὁἸ aὀ
anthropology of deification, that is, the
ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄ’ὅ aὀthὄὁpὁlὁgy
 par excellence
.VCONCLUSIONS AND REMARKSAs noted at the beginning of this paper, Maximus uses the word
α
 with different meanings in different contexts
 —
most notably, he often employs its plural
α
 meaning
‘thἷ agἷὅ’, a vἷὄy lὁὀg ἶuὄatiὁὀ iὀ timἷ, hiὅtὁὄyέ ώὁwἷvἷὄ, thἷ χἷὁὀ aὅ a ὅἷἵὁὀἶ mὁἶἷ ὁἸ
temporality beyond time (
) iὅ ἵlἷaὄly tὁ ἴἷ ἶiὅἵἷὄὀἷἶ iὀ εaximuὅ’ wὁὄk aὀἶ ἵἷὄtaiὀἵhaὄaἵtἷὄiὅtiἵὅ thἷὄἷὁἸ ἷmἷὄgἷ iὀ thἷ ἑὁὀἸἷὅὅὁὄ’ὅ paὅὅagἷὅέ
 (i)
 
The Aeon
iὅ ‘timἷ ἶἷpὄivἷἶ ὁἸ mὁtiὁὀ’, iὀ a ἶual aὀἶ iὀtἷὄtwiὀἷἶ ἶἷἸiὀitiὁὀ ὁἸtἷmpὁὄality iὀ whiἵh timἷ iὅ ‘thἷ χἷὁὀ, whἷὀ mἷaὅuὄἷἶ iὀ itὅ mὁtiὁὀ’έ
83
 This definition does not merely provide us with an understanding of the Aeon through our more familiar notion of time; rather than that, the interrelation of the Aeon and time establishes both of them as dependent on one another, as two irreplaceable sides of the same reality.(ii)
 
The Aeon is also defined as constituting the temporality of the intelligible realm, the temporality of intelligible beings. All beings are divided into sensible and intelligible beings, and while time constitutes the temporality of the sensible, the Aeon corresponds to the intelligible. Here, again, both of these (sensible and intelligible, time and the Aeon) are vitally
iὀtἷὄὄἷlatἷἶ aὀἶ iὀtἷὄἵὁὀὀἷἵtἷἶμ ‘Thἷ ἷὀtitiἷὅ ὁὀ ἷaἵh ὅiἶἷ ὁἸ thiὅ ἶiviὅiὁὀ aὄἷ ὀatuὄally ὄἷlatἷἶtὁ ἷaἵh ὁthἷὄ thὄὁugh aὀ iὀἶiὅὅὁluἴlἷ pὁwἷὄ that ἴiὀἶὅ thἷm tὁgἷthἷὄ’έ
84
 (iii)
 
To be created is to have a beginning and to be in temporality. Both the sensible and the
iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ aὄἷ gἷὀἷὄatἷἶ, ἴut thἷ ὅἷὀὅiἴlἷ havἷ ἴἷἷὀ gἷὀἷὄatἷἶ aὀἶ havἷ thἷiὄ ἴἷgiὀὀiὀg ‘iὀtimἷ’, whilἷ thἷ iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ ‘iὀ thἷ χἷὁὀ’έ Thὁὅἷ that aὄἷ ἵὁὀtἷmplatἷἶ ‘iὀ thἷ χἷὁὀ’, iέἷέ
83
 
 Ambigua,
1164 BC.
84
 
 Ambigua,
 1153

.

 
 Draft
 —
 please do not cite. Final version in The Heythrop Journal: DOI: 10.1111/heyj.12319
intelligible beings, possess beginning, middle, and end as well. To be created is to possess temporality: this elevates temporality to one of the primary criteria and characteristics of createdness,
85
 a status that does not fully apply to spatiality as such, which is only a characteristic of the sensible world.(iv)
 
The Aeon cannot be described as the temporality of the uncreated, for it has had a beginning, as well as everything in it.
86
 
ώὁwἷvἷὄ, Ἰὄὁm humaὀity’ὅ aὀἶ thἷ ὅἷὀὅiἴlἷ ἵὄἷatiὁὀ’ὅ
point of view, the Aeon
iconizes
the absolute timelessness of the uncreated and
refers
to it.The apparent changelessness of the intelligible
 —
from the perspective of the sensible
 —
reflects the absolute motionlessness of the uncreated. And the temporality of the apparently changeless intelligible world, the Aeon, reflects the absolute timelessness of the uncreated.
Thἷ humaὀ pἷὄὅὁὀ’ὅ ἷvἷὄ Ἰullἷὄ paὄtiἵipatiὁὀ iὀ thἷ χἷὁὀ aὀἶ iὀ thἷ iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ ὄἷalm iὅ thἷ
first step towards the cessation of motion and deification, due to their function as imperfect icons of the uncreated.(v)
 
Thἷ χἷὁὀ iὅ ‘timἷ ἶἷpὄivἷἶ ὁἸ mὁtiὁὀ’ aὀἶ ἵὁὀὅtitutἷὅ thἷ tἷmpὁὄality ὁἸ thἷ
intelligible, which, however, are in some sorts of motion. While intelligible beings are in
mὁtiὁὀ (‘ἷxpaὀὅiὁὀ’, ‘ἵὁὀtὄaἵtiὁὀ’ ἷtἵέ), thἷ χἷὁὀ it
self
 —
their mode of temporality
 —
is not susceptible to change. Intelligible beings are beings in motion that is generated and situated within a stable form of temporality, the Aeon. The Aeon is stable in that it cannot be
‘ἵiὄἵumὅἵὄiἴἷἶ ἴy a ὀumἴἷὄ’έ
87
 This i
ὅ a tὄait ὁἸ thἷ χἷὁὀ that iὅ iὀ ἵὁὀtὄaὅt tὁ timἷ’ὅ Ἰlὁatiὀg
and unstable nature.
88
 (vi)
 
The interrelation of time and space, time and spatiality is quite prominent in Maximus
 —
see, for example, sections 36-39 from the tenth
 Ambiguum ad Johannem
(PG91,1176D-1184A).This is a major difference of time and the sensible to the Aeon and the intelligible, for there is no spatiality, no dimension of space (e.g. in the emergence of
‘qualitiἷὅ’, iὀ thἷ ἶiὅtiὀἵtiὁὀ ὁἸ ‘ὅuἴὅtaὀἵἷὅ’ ἷtἵέ) iὀ what εaximuὅ ἶiὅtiὀguiὅhἷὅ aὅ ‘thἷ
 
iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ’
89
 —
which accordingly modifies what motion can mean when applied to intelligible beings. While the sensible move and change in space and time, the absence of the dimension of space accounts for the intelligible moving and changing against the background of the changeless Aeon.
85
 
Capita theologica et oeconomica,
1085 A
 ,
1.5.
86
 Ibid.
87
 Ibid.
88
 
 Ambigua,
11βί χ μ  υα 
 
υ φέ
 
89
 We must here repeat that the sensible/intelligible distinction is a philosophical distinction that does not
aἴὅἵὁὀἶ itὅ ἶἷlimitἷἶ ὄἷalitiἷὅ ἴut ‘ἴiὀἶὅ thἷm tὁgἷthἷὄ thὄὁugh aὀ iὀἶiὅὅὁluἴlἷ pὁwἷὄ’έ Thἷ iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ iὅ vἷὄyἸaὄ Ἰὄὁm ἴἷiὀg ‘aὀὁthἷὄ wὁὄlἶ’ aὅ
 
uὀἶἷὄὅtὁὁἶ iὀ myὅtiἵal ὁὄ ἷὅὁtἷὄiἵ ἵὁὀtἷxtὅέ With thἷ wὁὄἶ ‘iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ’,
Maximus denotes all beings and all of reality that are not perceived through sense-
 pἷὄἵἷptiὁὀ, whilἷ ‘thἷ ἷὀtitiἷὅ
on each side of this division are naturally related to each other
’έ όὁὄ ἷxamplἷ, iὀ thἷ ἶiὅtiὀἵtiὁὀ ὁἸ ὅuἴὅtaὀἵἷ aὀἶ
hypostasis, i.e. of homogeneity and the particular, it is only the particular that is sensible, that is accessible through the sense
 —
 not the homogeneity of the particulars itself, which is merely deducted from the hypostases(or, for those that attain to a fuller access to reality, contemplated as its

 
α)έ ώἷὄἷ, thἷ ‘ὅuἴὅtaὀἵἷ’ iὅ,ὁἸ ἵὁuὄὅἷ, ‘iὀtἷlligiἴlἷ’—
 without this making it less real, merely hypothetical or simply imaginary. The homogeneity of the particulars is neither unreal nor hypothetical nor imaginary: it is as real as the particulars of
whiἵh it iὅ thἷ ὅuἴὅtaὀἵἷέ ώὁwἷvἷὄ, ὀἷithἷὄ ‘hὁmὁgἷὀἷitiἷὅ’ ὀὁὄ ‘qualitiἷὅ’ (ἷέgέ tὁ ἴἷ ἵὁlἶ, tὁ ἴἷ ὀἷw, tὁ ἴἷ
colored, to be moist) occupy spaces. The intelligible is deprived of spatiality.

 
 Draft
 —
 please do not cite. Final version in The Heythrop Journal: DOI: 10.1111/heyj.12319
(vii)
 
Temporality, while being a
α
 
φ
 characteristic of createdness, is also an
ὁἴὅtaἵlἷ tὁ ἴἷ ὁvἷὄἵὁmἷ, alὁὀg with all ὁthἷὄ ἶiviὅiὁὀὅ aὀἶ ‘ἶiὅtaὀἵἷὅ’έ Thiὅ appliἷὅ tὁ ἴὁth
time and the Aeon. Even the Aeon must be
tὄaὀὅἵἷὀἶἷἶ ἴy humaὀity iὀ humaὀity’ὅ taὅk aὅ a
mediator.(viii)
 
Thuὅ, thἷ χἷὁὀ ἴἷἵὁmἷὅ a ἵὄuἵial paὄt ὁἸ εaximuὅ’ aὀthὄὁpὁlὁgy ὁἸ ἶἷiἸiἵatiὁὀ, aὅ it
is in this mode of temporality that the contemplation of the

 can be achieved, opening the way to the uncreated God. The participation in the a temporality of the uncreated is beyond time and the Aeon, beyond any conception of temporality, which is in itself a delimitation of createdness. However and as we have noted in the beginning, in speaking about deification Maximus introduces the notion of the
ever-moving repose
 (

 
ἀ
) which, being the end and perfection of motion beyond motionlessness itself, constitutes the
third
 mode of temporality, i.e. the transcendence and annihilation of
any
 temporality. Thus, a threefold conception of temporality can be traced in Maximus the Confessor, consisting of time, the Aeon, and the ever-moving repose.

Ted T.

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Time is only a measurement method for measuring movement, change. There is no time only when there is no movement. Since our physical universe from the smallest particles to the very largest galaxies are in constant flow and flux, there is always time.


And talking about our awareness of the passage of time as time itself is pretty suspect as it measure us, our perception, not time itself.


So, was anything moving, changing before the creation of the physical universe. Oh, yes, the Trinity with their constant communication with each other! Unless we  consider that THEY weren't thinking nor communicating in some unchanging state of suspended life so to speak, then time is as eternal as the Trinity itself.


GOD being outside of time is a blather and whatever problem that seemed to need that idea as its reconciliation should be studied for a resolution by a different way. GOD is aware of the beginning and the end at the same time because, as every reference to such things is about the physical universe, HE created it to be that way and HE knows everything that HE created perfectly, every movement and change in what HE created...except for the intrusion of those things into HIS creation that HE did not create, ie, the results of our free will decisions which we created, but that is a different topic.


« Last Edit: May 19, 2021, 11:32:49 am by Ted T. »
Wheat are NOT reborn / regenerate tares !!!

Matt 13:36-43  ...Declare unto us the parable of the tares of the field.

38 the field is the world
good seed are of the kingdom sown by the Son of man
tares are of the wicked one 39 sown by the devil


Who hath ears to hear, let him hear.
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patrick jane

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The Mystery of Time and How to Master It for Self Development [Occult Lecture]


The Mystery of Time and How to Master It for Self Development by Manly P. Hall


1 hour 20 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIhrygjzHQc

garee

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Have you ever thought about time.  Each of us only can view a millisecond of it at a time.  Like a projector flipping still pictures on a screen it creates the appearance of motion.

What causes things, all things to exist in the moment we experience them?  Do they exist a millisecond from now?  Do they continue to exist after we have viewed them and are on to the next frame?

Time is measured by change.  When things change very little time rushes by but when there is great change time seems much longer.  That is why when we are kids time seemed like forever but as we matured and changes in our lives slowed down, time seems to rush by.

What if beings were in the time stream a second ahead of us?  We would be aware of them. We could witness any residuals of their actions and see them in their past.  They would not be aware of us.  If they entered the time stream behind us, we would be unaware of them but they could witness our past.

Any way, it is just a thought...angles perhaps...maybe?

God is light and not that he can only create light   as a temporal source.  When he said in the beginning “let there be light” he made is unseen glorious  presence known

I would offer In time, and outside of time. Mixing of the two things seen the temporal with the unseen Faith eternal working together   brings the gospel. Called the mixing of faith in Hebrews 4 ,

Time winding down began of Day 4 .When the glory of God departed day 3  .With 3 used to denote the end of a matter throughout the Bible .  What the Bible calls under the Sun sensitive to time

There he set two witnesses to represent the father (Sun) and Son (moon ), the gospel.

The Sun is used as a parable to represent the power of God the greater position. . and the moon the reflected power, the lesser position.

When the last day on earth comes Then order will be retuned to the way it was  the first three days


 Revelation 21:And I saw no temple therein: for the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the temple of it. And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof. And the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it: and the kings of the earth do bring their glory and honour into it. And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: for there shall be no night there.



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patrick jane

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Have you ever thought about time.  Each of us only can view a millisecond of it at a time.  Like a projector flipping still pictures on a screen it creates the appearance of motion.

What causes things, all things to exist in the moment we experience them?  Do they exist a millisecond from now?  Do they continue to exist after we have viewed them and are on to the next frame?

Time is measured by change.  When things change very little time rushes by but when there is great change time seems much longer.  That is why when we are kids time seemed like forever but as we matured and changes in our lives slowed down, time seems to rush by.

What if beings were in the time stream a second ahead of us?  We would be aware of them. We could witness any residuals of their actions and see them in their past.  They would not be aware of us.  If they entered the time stream behind us, we would be unaware of them but they could witness our past.

Any way, it is just a thought...angles perhaps...maybe?

God is light and not that he can only create light   as a temporal source.  When he said in the beginning “let there be light” he made is unseen glorious  presence known

I would offer In time, and outside of time. Mixing of the two things seen the temporal with the unseen Faith eternal working together   brings the gospel. Called the mixing of faith in Hebrews 4 ,

Time winding down began of Day 4 .When the glory of God departed day 3  .With 3 used to denote the end of a matter throughout the Bible .  What the Bible calls under the Sun sensitive to time

There he set two witnesses to represent the father (Sun) and Son (moon ), the gospel.

The Sun is used as a parable to represent the power of God the greater position. . and the moon the reflected power, the lesser position.

When the last day on earth comes Then order will be retuned to the way it was  the first three days


 Revelation 21:And I saw no temple therein: for the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the temple of it. And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof. And the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it: and the kings of the earth do bring their glory and honour into it. And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: for there shall be no night there.
Good post garee. Have you joined my other forum? Here's the link:  https://whitehorseforums.com/

patrick jane

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Nikola Tesla Rediscovery of Free Energy - ROBERT SEPEHR



Alternative forms of advanced mathematics have been found etched on Babylonian clay tablets dating back over 3,000 years. This non-linear holistic view of math was also revered by none other than inventor and engineer Nikola Tesla, who once stated that, “If you knew the magnificence of the three, six and nine, you would have a key to the universe.”




36 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bqYMMbVv0Y




https://www.amazon.com/Robert-Sepehr/e/B00XTAB1YC%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share



Robert Sepehr is an author, producer and anthropologist specializing in linguistics, archeology, and paleobiology. A harsh critic of the out-of-Africa theory, Sepehr puts forth alternative diffusionist arguments involving advanced antediluvian civilizations, occult secret societies, ancient mythology, alchemy and astrotheology.

patrick jane

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https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2021/december-web-only/michel-new-year-productivity-time-management.html







There’s No Such Thing as Time Management












Maybe productivity doesn’t matter to God in the frantic ways I’ve imagined.


I used to be a lifetime reader of time management books. After the world shut down in March 2020, I got out of my pajamas to meet the challenge of an open schedule. I believed every article telling me that this was the propitious moment for cleaning out my closets, for organizing my pantry, for culling my photos.

And early in the pandemic, I loved my newly organized garage; I was glad to have tackled the towers of paperwork I usually avoided. Productivity is, of course, a modern source of existential consolation. A good day is the day you get things done.

But this new year, I won’t be hunting for a better planner. Nor will I be searching for the best new productivity app. For the first time, I will suffer no illusions this January that a new technique or a better consumer product will help tame the wild beast of time.

Time management is illusory. Though time might be money, as Benjamin Franklin famously said, we cannot grow our portfolio. Sure, we can try to maximize the yield of the minutes, but as the pandemic continues to teach us, tomorrow is never guaranteed. Rather, we must steward our attention.

Despite all my renewed productivity efforts early in the pandemic, I never managed to silence the beating bass of my anxious heart. I had plenty of time, productive time—and still suffered time-anxiety.

As a Christian, I know time matters to God, but I’m beginning to think it matters less to him in the frantic ways I’ve imagined. It’s certainly true we’ve only recently conceived of time as measurable and instrumental, as something to be used or wasted, saved or spent. But even before the invention of the clock—in the medieval monastery—human beings have long been time-anxious creatures.

As David Rooney writes in About Time, a few years after the first sundial was installed in Rome in 263 B.C., a character in a play exclaimed, “The gods damn that man who first discovered the hours, and—yes, who first set up a sundial here, who’s smashed the day into bits for poor me!”

Time management can’t solve the crisis of mortality, this foreboding sense that the days and the years prove short. To be sure, I’ve developed some helpful skills from the many time management books I’ve read: planning ahead, breaking down larger projects into smaller tasks, ruthlessly eliminating the nonessential. But as Melissa Gregg argues in Counterproductive, it’s probably also true that I could have read one good time management book, given how few new ideas have been proposed since the early 20th century.

What seems far more important than disciplines of time management are disciplines of attention management. The minutes are not ours to multiply. We receive them as a gift. What we can do, however, is cultivate the ability to inhabit those minutes with attention, or undiluted unfragmented presence. Simone Weil noticed the gains of attention in her spiritual life, when she began repeating the Lord’s prayer in Greek every day. Whenever her attention wandered, she started over again. “It was during one of these recitations that … Christ himself came down and took possession of me.”

Many have noted we live in an attentional economy, which is to say that what is most valuable today are the seconds, the minutes we linger online—time that is sold to someone for profit. When Facebook went public in 2012, for example, they did not have a clearly articulated plan for generating revenue, but they knew that they owned the world’s time.

Matthew Crawford notes in The World Beyond Your Head that one challenge in modern life is that our attention is not always ours to direct. We sit in an airport, stand in the line at the grocery, browse the daily headlines—and someone is there to blare their aggressively loud bullhorn, begging us to buy, subscribe, believe. Attention is a contested resource, and like a city without walls, it will be overrun unless we build walls and post sentries and fortify it against attack.

The conditions today make it hard to attend, especially with a smartphone buzzing in our pocket. But just as time-anxiety is old, so too is the fight for attention. It was attention the apostle Paul admonished the Philippians to cultivate: “[W]hatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things” (Phil. 4:8, ESV, emphasis added).

Paul was saying: Your attention is valuable. Develop it for the good. When Paul instructed the Corinthians to “take every thought captive” (2 Cor 10:5), I don’t think Paul believed that attention was merely a rational faculty. I think he was more broadly gesturing toward the moral exercise of attention of loving the good and habituating ourselves toward it: “What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things” (Phil 4:9).

Crawford argues that attention requires submission, which seems like a peculiarly Christian understanding. He knows the word is jarring, given that autonomy is often considered the highest good in modern life. Attention requires “submission to things that have their own intractable ways,” he writes, “whether the thing be a musical instrument, a garden, or the building of a bridge.” For Crawford, attention is never self-enclosed. It is not self-gaze. It is a form of devotion to the other. Attention requires not simply that we look up (from our phones) but that we look out—beyond ourselves.

I’ve become more interested in projects today that are preoccupied with the cultivation of attention—books like Justin Whitmel Earley’s The Common Rule, which our church small group is reading together. Earley’s book isn’t devoted to the management of time. Instead, it suggests regular rhythms—in time—that call us into submission to our Creator, the one to whom all time belongs: daily habits like kneeling prayer and digital ascetism and weekly habits like Sabbath and fasting.

This framework—of habits and a governing rule of life—is monastic. It’s an attention project. It’s not simply an individual exercise, however; it’s a communal one. Which begs the question of what churches can do to help their congregants cultivate the faculty of attention. In my own church context, I’d love for us to become less reliant on phones for operational business on Sunday mornings, making it possible, especially for those involved, to leave them at home, or at least silenced and effectively ignored. I’d love to see us corporately endeavor to think more carefully about our digital habits and practices throughout the week—because attention seems like an analog skill.

I think attention is what Brother Lawrence learned to practice in the monastery kitchen, as he washed plates. He didn’t concern himself with time and its elapsing, but rather considered that all time was valuable insofar as it was inhabited with devoted attention:

The time of business does not with me differ from the time of prayer; and in the noise and clatter of my kitchen, while several persons are at the same time calling for different things, I possess God in as great tranquility as if I were upon my knees at the blessed sacrament.

Time management marketing preys on existential dread: that life is short, that we are mortal. Its tips and tricks might help us manage some of the unwieldly aspects of contemporary life and work, but it will not teach us how to, as Brother Lawrence said, “do all things for the love of God.” For that, we will need practice in attention.





Jen Pollock Michel is a writer, podcast host, and speaker based in Toronto. She’s the author of four books and is working on a fifth: In Good Time: 8 Habits for Reimagining Productivity, Resisting Hurry, and Practicing Peace (Baker Books, 2022).

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https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2021/december-web-only/michel-new-year-productivity-time-management.html







There’s No Such Thing as Time Management












Maybe productivity doesn’t matter to God in the frantic ways I’ve imagined.


I used to be a lifetime reader of time management books. After the world shut down in March 2020, I got out of my pajamas to meet the challenge of an open schedule. I believed every article telling me that this was the propitious moment for cleaning out my closets, for organizing my pantry, for culling my photos.

And early in the pandemic, I loved my newly organized garage; I was glad to have tackled the towers of paperwork I usually avoided. Productivity is, of course, a modern source of existential consolation. A good day is the day you get things done.

But this new year, I won’t be hunting for a better planner. Nor will I be searching for the best new productivity app. For the first time, I will suffer no illusions this January that a new technique or a better consumer product will help tame the wild beast of time.

Time management is illusory. Though time might be money, as Benjamin Franklin famously said, we cannot grow our portfolio. Sure, we can try to maximize the yield of the minutes, but as the pandemic continues to teach us, tomorrow is never guaranteed. Rather, we must steward our attention.

Despite all my renewed productivity efforts early in the pandemic, I never managed to silence the beating bass of my anxious heart. I had plenty of time, productive time—and still suffered time-anxiety.

As a Christian, I know time matters to God, but I’m beginning to think it matters less to him in the frantic ways I’ve imagined. It’s certainly true we’ve only recently conceived of time as measurable and instrumental, as something to be used or wasted, saved or spent. But even before the invention of the clock—in the medieval monastery—human beings have long been time-anxious creatures.

As David Rooney writes in About Time, a few years after the first sundial was installed in Rome in 263 B.C., a character in a play exclaimed, “The gods damn that man who first discovered the hours, and—yes, who first set up a sundial here, who’s smashed the day into bits for poor me!”

Time management can’t solve the crisis of mortality, this foreboding sense that the days and the years prove short. To be sure, I’ve developed some helpful skills from the many time management books I’ve read: planning ahead, breaking down larger projects into smaller tasks, ruthlessly eliminating the nonessential. But as Melissa Gregg argues in Counterproductive, it’s probably also true that I could have read one good time management book, given how few new ideas have been proposed since the early 20th century.

What seems far more important than disciplines of time management are disciplines of attention management. The minutes are not ours to multiply. We receive them as a gift. What we can do, however, is cultivate the ability to inhabit those minutes with attention, or undiluted unfragmented presence. Simone Weil noticed the gains of attention in her spiritual life, when she began repeating the Lord’s prayer in Greek every day. Whenever her attention wandered, she started over again. “It was during one of these recitations that … Christ himself came down and took possession of me.”

Many have noted we live in an attentional economy, which is to say that what is most valuable today are the seconds, the minutes we linger online—time that is sold to someone for profit. When Facebook went public in 2012, for example, they did not have a clearly articulated plan for generating revenue, but they knew that they owned the world’s time.

Matthew Crawford notes in The World Beyond Your Head that one challenge in modern life is that our attention is not always ours to direct. We sit in an airport, stand in the line at the grocery, browse the daily headlines—and someone is there to blare their aggressively loud bullhorn, begging us to buy, subscribe, believe. Attention is a contested resource, and like a city without walls, it will be overrun unless we build walls and post sentries and fortify it against attack.

The conditions today make it hard to attend, especially with a smartphone buzzing in our pocket. But just as time-anxiety is old, so too is the fight for attention. It was attention the apostle Paul admonished the Philippians to cultivate: “[W]hatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things” (Phil. 4:8, ESV, emphasis added).

Paul was saying: Your attention is valuable. Develop it for the good. When Paul instructed the Corinthians to “take every thought captive” (2 Cor 10:5), I don’t think Paul believed that attention was merely a rational faculty. I think he was more broadly gesturing toward the moral exercise of attention of loving the good and habituating ourselves toward it: “What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things” (Phil 4:9).

Crawford argues that attention requires submission, which seems like a peculiarly Christian understanding. He knows the word is jarring, given that autonomy is often considered the highest good in modern life. Attention requires “submission to things that have their own intractable ways,” he writes, “whether the thing be a musical instrument, a garden, or the building of a bridge.” For Crawford, attention is never self-enclosed. It is not self-gaze. It is a form of devotion to the other. Attention requires not simply that we look up (from our phones) but that we look out—beyond ourselves.

I’ve become more interested in projects today that are preoccupied with the cultivation of attention—books like Justin Whitmel Earley’s The Common Rule, which our church small group is reading together. Earley’s book isn’t devoted to the management of time. Instead, it suggests regular rhythms—in time—that call us into submission to our Creator, the one to whom all time belongs: daily habits like kneeling prayer and digital ascetism and weekly habits like Sabbath and fasting.

This framework—of habits and a governing rule of life—is monastic. It’s an attention project. It’s not simply an individual exercise, however; it’s a communal one. Which begs the question of what churches can do to help their congregants cultivate the faculty of attention. In my own church context, I’d love for us to become less reliant on phones for operational business on Sunday mornings, making it possible, especially for those involved, to leave them at home, or at least silenced and effectively ignored. I’d love to see us corporately endeavor to think more carefully about our digital habits and practices throughout the week—because attention seems like an analog skill.

I think attention is what Brother Lawrence learned to practice in the monastery kitchen, as he washed plates. He didn’t concern himself with time and its elapsing, but rather considered that all time was valuable insofar as it was inhabited with devoted attention:

The time of business does not with me differ from the time of prayer; and in the noise and clatter of my kitchen, while several persons are at the same time calling for different things, I possess God in as great tranquility as if I were upon my knees at the blessed sacrament.

Time management marketing preys on existential dread: that life is short, that we are mortal. Its tips and tricks might help us manage some of the unwieldly aspects of contemporary life and work, but it will not teach us how to, as Brother Lawrence said, “do all things for the love of God.” For that, we will need practice in attention.





Jen Pollock Michel is a writer, podcast host, and speaker based in Toronto. She’s the author of four books and is working on a fifth: In Good Time: 8 Habits for Reimagining Productivity, Resisting Hurry, and Practicing Peace (Baker Books, 2022).


"As David Rooney writes in About Time, a few years after the first sundial was installed in Rome in 263 B.C., a character in a play exclaimed, “The gods damn that man who first discovered the hours, and—yes, who first set up a sundial here, who’s smashed the day into bits for poor me!”

 
God beat him to it...He made the day from the Night in a cycle that was considered one day.  Until he did this there was not time on earth....

Blade
1 Cor 15:3-4.."For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:"

Acts 17:11.."These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so."
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