+- +-

+- User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 119
Latest: Bella_777
New This Month: 2
New This Week: 1
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 17081
Total Topics: 874
Most Online Today: 255
Most Online Ever: 771
(July 30, 2019, 01:13:39 am)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 91
Total: 91

Author Topic: Why is endurance important?  (Read 876 times)

0 Members and 0 Guests are viewing this topic.

Lori Bolinger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 626
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Why is endurance important?
« on: February 14, 2020, 08:37:15 am »
My study today began with looking into endurance...why should we endure and what should we endure?

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter


patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Why is endurance important?
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2020, 11:26:25 am »
 If ye continue in the faith grounded and settled, and be not moved away from the hope of the gospel, which ye have heard, and which was preached to every creature which is under heaven; whereof I Paul am made a minister;
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.
Agree Agree x 1 View List

Lori Bolinger

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 626
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Why is endurance important?
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2020, 09:31:53 am »
Here are my study notes fom this week...Endurance is a huge part of our fellowship with Christ. We are to endure. One of the promises of scripture is that in this life, in this world, we will have trouble. (John 16:33) With that being one of the promises of God, it is understandable that we are commanded and equipped to endure. We will face hardships because of the world’s hatred for us. A world that first hated God and thus hates us for the God that they see in us. But this promise of enduring through hardship also carries a promise of deliverance if we endure. (Matthew 10:22; Matthew 24:13; Mark 13:13; Hebrews 10:32) God doesn’t just command us to endure, but He endures with us and our stubborn pride. His endurance is to show His patience and Love. (Romans 9:21-23) Even His righteousness endures forever, (II Corinthians 9:9) his very word endures forever. (I Peter 1:25)

In fact, endurance is the very mark of real Love. (I Corinthians 13:7) We need to endure through persecution, (I Corinthians 13:7; II Thessalonians 1:4) all the trials in this life, (I Corinthians 9:12) Our endurance is to bring others to Christ. It is a testimony to the Love, power, and mercy of the Living God. (II Timothy 2:10) Endurance fulfills our ministry here on earth. (II Timothy 4:5) Christ is our example of one who suffered and endured and if we keep our eyes on Him it will strengthen us to endure our own sufferings. (Hebrews 12:2-3) It also helps to endure if we see our suffering as God’s Love through discipline. (Hebrews 12:7)

When we endure, we are promised a reign with Christ. (II Timothy 2:12) We will be rescued from our suffering in His time and to His purpose. Our rescue may not be from the suffering but from the worldly goals and purposes for that suffering as we will soon see, (II Timothy 3:11) It is the one that endures that is blessed and known to be blessed. (James 1:12; James 5:11) Endurance brings favor from the Living God even if the suffering whether the suffering is just or unjust. (I Peter 2:19-20) Endurance will also protect us from the testing that is yet to come. (Revelation 3:10)

This life, this salvation that we are living in, is equated to a race in Hebrews 12:1 a race that we are to run with endurance. Romans 5:3 gives us another example of the purpose and joy of endurance when it tells us that afflictions produce endurance and endurance leads to proven character and proven character leads us to hope, a hope that does not disappoint because God’s Love is poured out in our hearts which gives us the Holy Spirit and all the wonderful things the Holy Spirit does in the life of the believer. Even all of scripture was given to us so that we could have hope, endurance, and encouragement in our walk with God. (Romans 15:1-6) When we endure the suffering that is before us, we are uniquely equipped to comfort others just as Christ is uniquely equipped to comfort us. (II Corinthians 1:3-11) Colossians 1:9-14 talks about the importance of praying for one another to have both endurance and patience with joy and thanksgiving. Our endurance is an endurance of hope. (I Thessalonians 1:2-10) An endurance that is in the power of the Living God. It is an endurance that is directed by the Living God. (II Thessalonians 3:1-5) I Timothy 6:11-16 tells us to pursue endurance along with our pursuit of righteousness, godliness, faith, Love, and gentleness. This endurance is an equipping by God to the life and tasks He has created for us. (II Timothy 3:10-17) We are to endure because of our understanding that we have a better and enduring possession in the Lord and our inheritance as His children. (Hebrews 10:26-39) We can run with endurance because we have put off the sins that weigh us down, because we keep our eyes on Christ and His endurance inspires us. (Hebrews 12:1-2) We are to take joy in the suffering that brings about endurance since the testing of our faith produces endurance and that endurance is meant to complete its work so that we are mature and complete in Christ, lacking nothing from the Lord. (James 1:2-18) Endurance also reveals the compassion and mercy of our Lord and God. (James 5:11) II Peter 1:3-15 tells us that faith needs to be accompanied by goodness, we build on goodness with knowledge, to knowledge self control. Self control is to be accompanied by endurance which is used to build goliness which adds brotherly affection and grows into Love. One growing upon the other. Our endurance is known and in the Lord Jesus Christ, full of hope, compassion and mercy. (Revelation 1:9)

II Corinthians 11:16-33 gives us a picture of some of the sufferings that Paul endured to spread the gospel but if you notice, what he most boasted of was not his endurance but his weakness. It was in his weakness that God made him strong. (II Corinthians 12:9-11) It is not our strength that allows us to endure all manner of suffering but instead, it is the power of God in us. None of the things we are about to look into came about because of man’s strength, but rather it was possible because of man’s weakness and God’s strength in man. The greater things than those that Christ did while on this earth. (John 14:12-14)

In light of all the scriptures that talk about enduring and this doesn't even include all that use the word persevere, it seems to me that endurance is indeed part of our spiritual journey

truthjourney

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 728
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Why is endurance important?
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2020, 10:33:21 am »
My study today began with looking into endurance...why should we endure and what should we endure?
I haven't read all the posts yet. But my first thoughts are that endurance affects our faith, trust, and hope in the Most High God. We are beaten down by so many things; financial problems, family problems, health problems, and spiritual attacks in different ways. The things happening in the world around us affects us and our endurance. Endurance is important because we need strength, hope, and faith to not grow weary and give up.
Eph. 5:11 Take no part in the worthless deeds of evil and darkness; instead, expose and rebuke them.
“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
Winner Winner x 1 View List

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Why is endurance important?
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2020, 01:23:30 pm »
I haven't had time to read and think really, but being physically weary also makes the mind and the spirit weary. We must pray for strength in Christ, within ourselves and our inner man/woman. Pray for you mind to be renewed and for spiritual strength and wisdom. This is in the wrong thread sorry.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.
Winner Winner x 1 View List

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9578
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Why is endurance important?
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2020, 06:43:51 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2020/september-web-only/bible-passages-persevere-special-issue-graves.html








10 Bible Passages That Help Us Persevere








Study leaders, authors, and scholars share how Scripture has sustained them during difficult times.


When life feels dark or the way ahead is unclear, God’s Word remains a lamp unto our feet and a light unto our path. Here, ten women reflect on Scripture passages that have strengthened and encouraged them during difficult times.


Jo Saxton on Matthew 14:22—36


As a child, I loved this passage. It resonated strongly with me when I realized COVID-19 would change our lives. The rise of the pandemic was like watching a storm brewing: Relatives around the world shared their stories, school was canceled, and my work was canceled or postponed. I read this passage multiple times a day for over a week.

When Peter stepped out of the boat before the storm was still, he walked on the words Jesus said to him. I am challenged to walk on Jesus’ words to me amid life’s storms, even if they don’t make sense. God not only speaks to us through the storms of life, but he also meets with us and speaks to us in the heart of the storm, when we’re at the end of ourselves and all hope is gone.

As a child, I was stunned by the power of God. Now, this passage reminds me of God’s tender kindness, the extraordinary lengths he went to for his friends in need, and how he transformed their lives. Jesus takes time to heal the crowd (vv. 35–36) even though initially he’d avoided the crowd to get some rest. Would I go to extraordinary lengths so my friends could encounter peace, hope, and love?


Jen Wilkin on Psalm 139

As a young, overwhelmed mom, growing in my awareness of my own limits, I needed a vision of a transcendent God to reorient me. Psalm 139 delivers. “Search me, God,” David wrote. "See if there is any offensive way in me” (vv. 23–24). His worshipful response to meditating on the limitlessness of God is a desire to slay what opposes God. I want to be the same: “Put to death, therefore, whatever belongs to your earthly nature” (Col. 3:5). I want my adoration of God to result in an abhorrence of sin.

In times of difficulty, we tend to look inward or to another person or a created thing for help. Initially, I viewed Psalm 139 as God showing interest in all that made me special. But I was surprised to connect the end of the psalm to the beginning, which asks that God continue searching and knowing, testing me, regarding my anxious thoughts and offensive ways. God reads my sins and weaknesses perfectly, and I should ask him to keep doing that. Healthy human relationships are predicated on honoring one another as image-bearers rather than worshiping or demanding worship from one another. When I put my sin to death, my neighbor benefits. Right love of God leads to right love of self and neighbor.

Wilkin is an author and Bible teacher from Dallas. Her books include Women of the Word and None Like Him.


Jeannine K. Brown on Hebrews 12:1-3
I love the image of my journey with Christ as a race. We “press on toward the goal” (Phil. 3:14) with passion and with perseverance. It brings to mind Eugene Peterson’s phrase “a long obedience in the same direction.” The author of Hebrews challenges me to shed whatever hinders me in the race (12:1). Moreover, in this race of faith, I have someone on my side who’s fully invested in that same race. In Jesus, God is on our side, and God is by our side.

Recently, I was struck by the language of joy when meditating on this passage. “For the joy set before him,” Jesus endured the suffering and shame of the cross. Jesus, who reveals God to us, is characterized by joy. Additionally, the first line points us back to Hebrews 11. While meditating on this image of a “cloud of witnesses,” I think of my grandmother, whose faith was enlivened at a revival meeting a century ago and who taught me one of her favorite hymns, “Children of the Heavenly Father,” in Swedish. I am not alone in my journey of faith. We are surrounded by faithful others, both past and present. And Jesus, at the center of our faith, is our guide.

Brown is a professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary and a member of the NIV Committee on Bible Translation. Her most recent book is The Gospels as Stories.


Anjuli Paschall on Mark 10:46-52

I have five kids. When I was struggling, drowning in diapers, a dear friend asked me, “What do you want?” I could tell people what I needed, but I didn’t know what I wanted. I would have a desire—like wanting time alone—and stuff it or suffocate it and then get so angry. I finally grew to understand that for me to love others well, I need to be vulnerable by expressing what I want.

When Bartimaeus gropes his way over to Jesus, they stand face to face. Jesus wants to hear Bartimaeus tell him what he wants. This passage reminds me: God loves me and says, Come over here, get face to face, tell me what you want. It’s vulnerable to tell Jesus what you really, really want. But expressing our wants and longings shows the movement of our hearts, our formation, part of what makes us whole. Speak your greatest heart’s desire to God, whether people tease you, or it’s embarrassing, or it doesn’t make sense. That’s Bartimaeus, right? Even important people told him to be quiet, but he spoke up. May we speak louder like Bartimaeus!

Paschall is a spiritual director and the author of Stay: Discovering Grace, Freedom, and Wholeness Where You Never Imagined Looking.


Carmen Joy Imes on Psalm 10
Years ago, I was under a gag order during an investigation. I felt powerless and alone, with no one to advocate for me. Psalm 10:14 was balm to my soul: “You, God, see the trouble of the afflicted; you consider their grief and take it in hand.” I discovered how powerfully the Psalms address the powerless. They gave me words when I did not know how to pray.

Some people struggle with the apparent violence of the Psalms. In my crisis, I discovered that these psalms align with God’s justice. Yes, God is merciful and compassionate, but he also does not leave the guilty unpunished (Ex. 34:6–7). He not only comforts us but is the kind of God who stops the wicked in their tracks before they can do more harm (Ps. 10:15). The Psalms bolstered my trust in a God who fights on my behalf. They also chasten and challenge me not to participate in the oppression of others. Now, when friends feel powerless or abandoned or attacked, I pray the Psalms on their behalf. God does not ask us to put on a happy face; violent psalms like Psalm 10 invite us to come to God with our most desperate prayers.

Imes is professor of Old Testament at Prairie College. She is the author of Bearing God’s Name: Why Sinai Still Matters.


M. Sydney Park on 1 Corinthians 2:1–5

This passage is always meaningful, especially in the past two decades as we face a pervasive culture of self-promotion in the evangelical church. Believers seem to have lost sight of the necessary mindset of the church as outlined in Philippians 2:5–11: “Have the same mindset as Christ Jesus: Who … made himself nothing … becoming obedient to death.”

First Corinthians 2:1–5 reminds me of the palpable testimony given to the world by the apostles. Conformity to the world is not inevitable, but true proclamation of the gospel message must come by means other than worldly wisdom. This requires cruciformity not only in ethics and identity (being) but also in our method. Paul reminds us that such complete conformity to Christ crucified necessarily results in the mighty work of the Holy Spirit and the power of God. The only way to love our neighbors as Christ loved us is through self-sacrifice.


Park is a professor at Beeson Divinity School with a focus on New Testament theology, biblical interpretation, and Greek.


Kristie Anyabwile on Psalm 18:30
Nothing is beyond the reach or the knowledge of God; his way is perfect. Even though this pandemic and its effects are painful and hard for so many people, God doesn’t change. That helps me to put this season in perspective. It ain’t gonna last; it’s not the end. All we see and experience in this life is but a vapor. Nothing and no one can thwart the outworking of God’s providence. He proves true and will effect what he intends to accomplish in our lives and in the world.

The implied imperative in Psalm 18:30 is to seek God for safety and security—but that’s not always easy because we have our own ideas about what we think we need to have a sense of security. Particularly during these coronavirus times, a verse like this exposes our rugged independence and makes us aware of how out of control we really are. This verse challenges me to be fully dependent on the Lord, to seek him for refuge, and to not seek security in the conveniences of this life.

Anyabwile is a Bible teacher and the editor of His Testimonies, My Heritage: Women of Color on the Word of God.


Vaneetha Rendall Risner on Isaiah 43:1-2

When my ex-husband left our family, I was terrified. How would I manage with my disability? Would my daughters walk away from their faith? How would I manage my household on my own? I felt betrayed and alone, my self-image shattered.

I love how Isaiah 43:1–2 tells me that God calls me by name. He tells me not to fear. He redeems me—which gives me worth. This passage reassures me that whatever I go through, God will be with me and my trials won’t overwhelm me: “When you pass through the waters, I will be with you.”

I’ve sensed God’s presence most closely in suffering—a gift he offers to comfort us in pain. That doesn’t mean we won’t struggle, suffer loss, or even die. I have a close friend with ALS who knows all three will happen. What God promises here is that we won’t be overcome with despair. No matter what’s going on around us, we can be sure God will never leave us. He will walk through every fiery trial with us. He will make sure the rivers do not overwhelm us. And with God beside us, we know there is nothing to fear.

Risner writes and speaks on suffering. Her books include The Scars That Have Shaped Me and Walking Through Fire (Thomas Nelson, January 2021).



Chrystal Evans Hurst on Philippians 4:6-7
My 15-year-old son had a traumatic birth, resulting in nerve damage that led to difficulty in using his right arm his first few months. I was especially anxious and worried during that time—I so badly wanted him to be healed. Peace came over time as I turned to prayer and focused on thinking profitable thoughts—dwelling on what was good and right despite what I couldn’t change.

This passage challenges me to maintain peace by continually coming to God instead of only reactively coming to God when I feel anxiety. If we only focus on the source of anxiety or pain, then we miss the other wonderful things God is doing. Prayer is a weapon, a tool, a source of strength and power.

We don’t have to handle it, or figure everything out on our own, or move mountains in our own strength. We can bring our concerns to God with thanksgiving, ask him for what we want, and then yield to what he wants for us and for those we’re praying for. Prayer will keep our hearts and minds from racing and ease our physical bodies from the havoc stress can wreak on them.

Hurst is a speaker, worship leader, and author. Her books include The 28-Day Prayer Journey and She’s Still There.



Ann Voskamp on Romans 8:31-32

As farmers, we have been living on the edge for 25 years. Our life requires that we trust God at a really deep level—we have droughts, we have bad weather, and so on. Romans 8:32 is our life verse: “He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all—how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things?” This verse has given us Jesus. He will not necessarily give us what we want, but he will give us what we need. If he gave himself up for us all, gave me everything, then he will give me what I need each moment. It is safe to trust.

Trust is the bridge from yesterday to tomorrow, built with what God has done in the past. In trust, we can walk from the known to the unknown. Today, with what we see happening in terms of many of our livelihoods, it looks like the bridge underneath us is going to give way. But when it seems to give way, we are falling into Christ’s safe arms.

So, in trust, I can live generously toward others, thereby destroying the myth of scarcity. We get to live life given away—a cruciform life—and show the world what it means to live in Christ. Stepping into trust is actually what faith means. If I keep thanking him, it builds all those planks of trust for me to step from the known into the unknown.

Voskamp is a speaker, blogger, and author of several books, including The Broken Way and One Thousand Gifts.









Compiled by Marlena Graves, author of The Way Up Is Down and Beautiful Disaster.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
11 Replies
2332 Views
Last post July 11, 2019, 05:45:18 am
by patrick jane
5 Replies
1340 Views
Last post July 11, 2019, 06:02:30 am
by patrick jane
2 Replies
928 Views
Last post January 14, 2020, 08:40:34 am
by Lori Bolinger
0 Replies
393 Views
Last post August 21, 2020, 12:56:38 pm
by Lori Bolinger

+-Recent Topics

Being saved... by patrick jane
Today at 01:09:25 pm

CORONAVIRUS - THE PALE HORSE by Bladerunner
Today at 09:27:26 am

Black Spring With Autumn Political Commentary by patrick jane
Today at 12:56:27 am

Freemasons, Jesuits, Illuminati & Lucifer Worship by patrick jane
Today at 12:17:12 am

End Times - Tracking The Signs by patrick jane
Today at 12:17:01 am

Revelation - Last Days by patrick jane
Today at 12:16:16 am

NEW WORLD ORDER SYMBOLS & MEANINGS by ODD TV by patrick jane
Today at 12:15:44 am

Hollywood Occult Symbolism and Conspiracy by patrick jane
Today at 12:15:32 am

Aethereal - Battle for Heaven and Earth by patrick jane
Today at 12:14:50 am

Conspiracy - NWO, NASA and More by patrick jane
Today at 12:14:36 am

Child Abuse Is Not Funny by truthjourney
September 25, 2020, 11:52:56 pm

Trump 2020 - Winning !!! by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:52:02 pm

Politics Today by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:51:51 pm

Re: Trump 2020 - Winning !!! by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:51:25 pm

Re: Politics Today by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 11:50:52 pm

Creepy Joe Biden by truthjourney
September 25, 2020, 11:30:10 pm

Ministry On Video by Lion Of Judah by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 10:29:03 pm

WALT DISNEY THE PERVERT OCCULTIST by patrick jane
September 25, 2020, 10:19:01 pm