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Author Topic: Immersive Van Gogh Digital Art Shows Coming to Nearly 30 U.S. Cities  (Read 141 times)

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patrick jane

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Submerged in Van Gogh: Would Absinthe Make the Art Grow Fonder?


https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/09/arts/design/van-gogh-immersive-manhattan.html





Babies don’t develop stereoscopic vision for the first few months of their life; they have a hard time perceiving depth and dimensions, and therefore gravitate to swirling shapes and bright colors. They and others with similar taste will find great pleasure in our culture’s latest virally transmitted spectacles, which distill fin-de-siècle French painting into an amusement as captivating as a nursery mobile.

Vincent van Gogh, his corpse moldering in Auvers-sur-Oise and his paintings out of copyright, has these past few years been dragooned into a new sort of immersive exhibition that reproduces his churning paintings of Provence as wall-filling animated projections — you may have seen them on Instagram, or on a Netflix indignity called “Emily in Paris.” The Franco-Dutch artist has always been a huge box-office draw (the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam drew 2 million visitors in 2019), but a touring exhibition of paintings takes years and costs millions, and reputable museums don’t lend their works to a for-profit enterprise.

What a few entrepreneurial exhibitionists figured out is that many of us are less attached to van Gogh’s paintings than to the mythology that surrounds them. And that you can exhibit for cheap.



https://vp.nyt.com/video/2021/06/08/94083_1_08van-gogh-immersive-5video_wg_720p.mp4
“Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience,” at 300 Vesey Street. Above, an animated reproduction of “Self-Portrait” (1889), painted in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, and in the collection of the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.CreditCredit...Video by Sam Youkilis


Producers have strung together hi-res digital copies of “Bedroom in Arles” or “Wheatfield with Crows” into medium-length films, supplemented with astral soundtracks (and well-stocked gift shops). These things are such profit spinners that half a dozen competing Vincent spectacles have arisen, drawing millions of visitors from Toledo to Abu Dhabi to shell out for a 21st-century version of the Joshua Light Show.

Now these “Starry Night”-filled rooms have come to the city that actually owns “Starry Night” — and indeed here in New York we’ve got 20-odd other van Goghs, held between the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Through the fall, these actual van Goghs share the island with two postimpressionist fairground attractions, one on each Lower Manhattan riverside, jockeying for supremacy in Google search results.


https://vp.nyt.com/video/2021/06/08/94082_1_08van-gogh-immersive-video4_wg_720p.mp4
“Immersive Van Gogh” on Pier 36. An animated reproduction of “The Bedroom,” 1888, and in the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam.CreditCredit...Video by Sam Youkilis



“Immersive Van Gogh,” on Pier 36 near the Manhattan Bridge, favors lavish, synesthetic visuals. “Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience,” in Battery Park City, offers a more chronological path through his sun-drenched and star-dappled landscapes. Each features irises, sunflowers and almond blossoms, cloned and flipped at mural scale, their short brush strokes whirling like cold fronts on Sam Champion’s five-day AccuWeather forecast.

Like Vincent, I too suffer for my art, and so I attended both of them. If you are committed to trying one out, go to the east side, which has graphics of meaningfully greater sophistication. (Adult tickets range from about $36 to $55 and rise with various fees, supplements and hustles. MoMA is $25, and the Met is pay-what-you-wish for locals.) Whether you attend either or both you should bring a fully charged cameraphone; some might also enjoy a psychedelic supplement, and in fact the east side venue plans to install an absinthe bar later on. Sensuous selfie backdrops come well before intellectual engagement here, so you might as well make the most of it.



https://vp.nyt.com/video/2021/06/08/94076_1_08van-gogh-immersive-1_wg_720p.mp4
At the “Immersive Van Gogh,” a reproduction of “Wheat field (Champs de blé),” from 1888.CreditCredit...Video by Sam Youkilis


At the east side venue, designed by the Broadway set designer David Korins, three consecutive rooms display the same video projections, created by Massimiliano Siccardi. Mirrored objects strewn throughout reflect the screens; you sit on the floor, on a few benches, or (if you’re feeling flush) on a rented cushion.

On the west side, the projections fill a single, much taller room, equipped with beach chairs. An English-accented narrator drones van Gogh quotations over the west side’s projections; the east side show is unnarrated, backed instead by a trip-hop remix of Samuel Barber’s “Adagio for Strings” and, more curiously, Édith Piaf belting out “Non, je ne regrette rien.” The west side show offers more introductory materials, though really, you could just read the van Gogh entry on Wikipedia while you’re at each.

Both exhibitions emphasize van Gogh as a lone, tortured genius rather than a figure of history, and both imply through their editing and exposition that his thick outlines and non-local color were a spontaneous outpouring of his soul. Fair enough if you don’t want to chart the development of painterly style in 19th-century France, but even the rudiments of van Gogh are not easy to capture in photographic reproductions.

If you go to MoMA to see “Starry Night,” or to the Yale University Art Gallery (free admission!) to visit “The Night Café,” you can spend as much time as you like examining van Gogh’s mastery of impasto — that is, the thick application of paint that gives the paintings their nervous, shuddering quality. In these wall-size screen savers, impasto has to be mimicked through motion: dancing brush strokes, falling leaves, flapping crows.


https://vp.nyt.com/video/2021/06/08/94084_1_08van-gogh-immersive-6video_wg_720p.mp4
Animated reproduction of “Starry Night Over the Rhône” (1888), in “Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience” at 300 Vesey Street.CreditCredit...Video by Sam Youkilis


The animations at the west side show are rudimentary and have herky-jerky transitions that reminded me of the solitaire app I used to play in Windows 95. The east side show is cleaner and sexier, though not more sophisticated than the flat-screen visuals in airport terminals or sports stadiums.

In both cases, the digital reproductions — particularly of the 1888 Arles street scene “Café Terrace at Night” — strongly recall the escapist fantasies of anime, and the childish moral sentiments that go with them. Contrasted with the immoderate passions of the 1956 movie “Lust for Life,” or the 2018 biopic “At Eternity’s Gate,” these selfie chambers are as benign as the Japanese animated film “My Neighbor Totoro.” The art’s personal anguish and social tensions both dissolve into a mist of let’s-pretend; this van Gogh is less an artist than a craftsman of other worlds. (A “universe,” as the Marvel or Harry Potter fans say.)

As for the technology: although these immersives have been touted as breakthroughs in exhibition design, room-filling cinema projections go back many decades. The shows hark back in particular to multi-projector attractions at the World’s Fair in Queens in 1964 and at Expo ’67 in Montreal, which cast humanist visions of the future in all directions. What’s new today is something else: not the pictures on the walls, but the phone in your hand. Individual absorption, rather than shared wonder, is the order of the day now. From every vantage point you will fill your phone’s backlit screen with glowing imagery, and there’s more than enough space to crop out other visitors and frame only yourself.



https://vp.nyt.com/video/2021/06/08/94085_1_08van-gogh-immersive-7video_wg_720p.mp4
“Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience” at 300 Vesey Street. Here, an animated reproduction of “Almond Blossom,” 1890, painted in Saint-Rémy.CreditCredit...Video by Sam Youkilis


Is it all worth your hard-earned guilders? The east side immersion runs on a loop of about 35 minutes, the west side one about an hour. Not long for a ticket so pricey, but you can stay as long as you like, and both offer sideshows to boost your value. On the west side there’s a 3-D replica of van Gogh’s Arles bedroom, a coloring station for children, as well as a virtual reality experience that whisks you through a waxy simulation of Arles.

The east side show has booths rigged up with sounds associated with colored lights to suggest the chromesthesia van Gogh described in letters to his brother Theo, plus mannequins wearing shockingly tacky van Gogh-inspired clothing. (Where might these dresses festooned with wheat and sunflowers be appropriate? The Miss Provence pageant? Is there a Saint-Rémy drag night I don’t know about?) Also a bar with snacks sold “to Gogh,” which is a cute joke that only works in America — the French pronounce his name “van GOGUE,” the Dutch “fun KHOKH,” and Diane Keaton in “Manhattan” prefers “van GOKH,” the final consonant disdainfully ejected from the back of the throat.



https://vp.nyt.com/video/2021/06/08/94092_1_08van-gogh-immersive-10video_wg_720p.mp4
At “Immersive Van Gogh,” a reproduction of “Cafe Terrace, Place du Forum, Arles,” from 1888.CreditCredit...Video by Sam Youkilis


Keaton’s character in “Manhattan” has nominated van Gogh (alongside Ingmar Bergman and Gustav Mahler) for her “Academy of the Overrated,” and there is a shooting-fish-in-a-barrel version of this review that could end: painting is not spectacle, and van Gogh is more than decoration. Even this era’s most narcissist-friendly art installations — Yayoi Kusama’s “Infinity Rooms,” Random International’s “Rain Room,” or the all-engrossing environments of Miami’s Superblue — are at least original works, with a greater aim than artistic brand activation.

Still, after a few hours in these sensoria, I had to believe that the millions of visitors who enjoy these immersive van Gogh displays are getting something out of it. There’s a speechless and irreducible quality to great art, a value that goes beyond communication or advocacy. And if audiences find that quality more immediately here than they do in our traditional institutions, maybe we should be asking why.

Have our museums and galleries played down too much the emotional impact of the art they show? In the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s gallery 822, you can stand as long as you like in front of van Gogh’s “Wheat Field with Cypresses,” the agitated clouds rolling like waves, its climbing greenery edged with trembling blacks. I want everyone to discover, right there in the thick grooves of the oil paint, the wonder and vitality of art that needs no animation. There has got to be a way to lead people back to that discovery, even if some of us take a selfie afterward.

Immersive Van Gogh

Through Sept. 6, Pier 36, 299 South Street. (East River), Lower Manhattan; vangoghnyc.com; 844-307-4644. Currently in Chicago and San Francisco and scheduled to travel to Los Angeles next. Timed reservations required.

Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience

Through Nov. 6, Skylight on Vesey, 300 Vesey Street. (Battery Park City); Lower Manhattan; vangoghexpo.com/new-york.



« Last Edit: June 10, 2021, 11:27:41 am by patrick jane »
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

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patrick jane

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Re: Beyond Van Gogh Exhibit
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2021, 11:12:38 am »
About Beyond Van Gogh






In an imaginative and immersive presentation crafted for our unique times by world renowned audiovisual designers, Beyond Van Gogh uses cutting-edge projection technology to create an engaging journey into the world of Van Gogh. Using his dreams, his thoughts, and his words to drive the experience as a narrative, we move along projection swathed walls wrapped in light, colour, and shapes that swirl, dance and refocus into flowers, cafes and landscapes.


Masterpieces, now freed from frames, come alive, appear and disappear, flow across multi-surfaces, the minutia of details titillating our heightened senses. Through his own words set to a symphonic score, we may come to a new appreciation of this tortured artist’s stunning work.









Immersive Van Gogh Digital Art Shows Coming to Nearly 30 U.S. Cities



Tickets are on sale in New York, Chicago, and other cities for five different traveling exhibitions featuring the Dutch painter’s famous works.



https://www.afar.com/magazine/where-to-see-immersive-van-gogh-exhibits-in-the-us-in-2021

Over the past few years, immersive digital art museums have drawn crowds everywhere from Tokyo to Paris to Bordeaux. (There was even a drive-in exhibit in Toronto last year.) Now, people in the United States finally get to enjoy this 360-degree experience set to music with not one, but five traveling shows featuring the work of Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh. While each of the shows is distinct, they are similar in that they place visitors in the middle of large-scale moving images that are projected onto the walls, ceilings, and floors in a large gallery or warehouse space.

Exhibits in Chicago, San Francisco, and St. Petersburg, Florida, are already open, while ticket sales have started—and are already selling out—for experiences in Los Angeles and New York opening later this spring. Find out more about where each show is happening, how they differ (slightly), and how to get tickets before they’re gone:

1. Immersive Van Gogh
Created and run by the same team behind Atelier des Lumières in Paris (aka the digital art show featured in Netflix’s Emily in Paris), Immersive Van Gogh features more than 500,000 cubic feet of projections and lasts one hour. Expect to see iconic van Gogh works including The Potato Eaters (1885), Starry Night (1889), Sunflowers (1888), and The Bedroom (1889). The large-scale digital animations of the Dutch painter’s work are set to original songs composed by Italian multimedia composer Luca Longobardi.

The show is currently open in Chicago and San Francisco, with upcoming events in 16 other cities in the next few months. In a review in the Chicago Tribune, arts reporter Steve Johnson likened it to an “updated version” of those 1970s Pink Floyd laser light shows at a planetarium.

“But instead of the borderline skeezy rock culture undertones of a Floyd show, making it about an artist . . . puts a veneer of high culture on the whole thing,” Johnson wrote. “Tonight’s head trip is being sponsored by your college’s core curriculum requirement in humanities and the arts.”

Tickets are sold by timed entry and are going quickly (the L.A. show is sold out through mid-November 2021 already). Social distancing circles are projected on the floor of the gallery to give guests their own space during their visit.

Chicago
When: February 11–November 28, 2021
Where: Lighthouse ArtSpace at Germania Club
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghchicago.com

San Francisco
When: March 18–September 6, 2021
Where: SVN West San Francisco (formerly the Fillmore West)
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghsf.com

Los Angeles
When: May 27, 2021–January 2, 2022
Where: Secret LA location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghla.com

New York City
When: June 10–September 6, 2021
Where: Pier 36 NYC
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghnyc.com

Dallas
When: June 17–September 6, 2021
Where: Secret Dallas location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, dallasvangogh.com

Charlotte, North Carolina
When: June 17–September 12, 2021
Where: Ford building at Camp North End
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghclt.com

Las Vegas
When: July 1–September 6, 2021
Where: Secret Las Vegas location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $60 for adults, vangoghvegas.com

Phoenix
When: July 29–September 26, 2021
Where: Secret Phoenix location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghphx.com

Minneapolis
When: August 2–September 26, 2021
Where: Secret Minneapolis location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghmsp.com

Houston
When: August 12–October 10, 2021
Where: Secret Houston location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, houstonvangogh.com

Cleveland, Ohio
When: September 9–November 28, 2021
Where: Secret Cleveland location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghcleveland.com

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
When: September 23–November 28, 2021
Where: Secret Pittsburgh location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, vangoghpittsburgh.com

Denver
When: September 30, 2021–February 6, 2022
Where: Secret Denver location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, denvervangogh.com

Orlando, Florida
When: October 7, 2021–February 6, 2022
Where: Secret Denver location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, orlandovangogh.com

Detroit
When: October 21, 2021–February 6, 2022
Where: Secret Orlando location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, detroitvangogh.com

Columbus, Ohio
When: October 28, 2021–Janaury 2, 2022
Where: Secret Columbus location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, columbusvangogh.com

Nashville
When: November 4, 2021–February 6, 2022
Where: Secret Nashville location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, nashvillevangogh.com

Kansas City, Missouri
When: December 1, 2021–February 6, 2022
Where: Secret Kansas City location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 for adults, kansascityvangogh.com


2. Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience
Featuring 20,000 square feet of projections, Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience is run in partnership with two immersive experience companies: Exhibition Hub, which has produced exhibitions everywhere from Europe to America and Asia, and Fever, which is known for creating the Stranger Things: The Drive-Into Experience in Los Angeles.

This digital art show features similar van Gogh masterpieces set to music, and it takes about 60 to 75 minutes to experience in full. VIP Access also enables visitors to experience an additional virtual reality component of the exhibition, a 10-minute journey through a day in van Gogh’s life that places you in the center of his most personal paintings. (Equipment will be disinfected after each use.)

Timed-entry tickets are on sale currently for all 10 U.S. cities the show is traveling to in 2021. Tickets will be limited to guarantee space for social distancing.

Las Vegas
When: April 6–July 5, 2021
Where: Area15
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $35 ($19 for children 12 or younger, $28 for military, seniors 65 and older), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, area15.com.

Miami
When: May 8–August 30, 2021
Where: Secret Miami location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $35 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $25 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

Atlanta
When: May 19–August 29, 2021
Where: Pullman Yards, Building 1
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $32 ($19 for children 12 or younger, $21 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

New York City
When: June 26–October 24, 2021
Where: Skylight on Vesey
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $36 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $22 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

Dallas
When: July 5–November 28, 2021
Where: Secret Dallas location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $36 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $25 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

Washington, D.C.
When: July 23–December 26, 2021
Where: Secret D.C. location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $36 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $25 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

Philadelphia
When: August 12–November 21, 2021
Where: Secret Philadelphia location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $35 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $25 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

Houston
When: August 30, 2021–January 2, 2022
Where: Secret Houston location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $35 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $25 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

Seattle
When: September 10, 2021–January 2, 2022
Where: Secret Seattle location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $36 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $25 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

Boston
When: September 24, 2021–January 23, 2022
Where: Secret Boston location, to be announced soon
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $36 ($20 for children 12 or younger, $25 for military, seniors 65 and older, and students 13 to 26), with VIP and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, feverup.com.

3. Van Gogh Alive
Created by the Melbourne, Australia–based Grande Experiences, the traveling Van Gogh Alive show has been exhibited everywhere from New Zealand to Mexico. This 40-minute show features 3,000 moving van Gogh images—including Sunflowers (1888) and Starry Night (1889)—set to a classical music score.

After its stint at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida—which was just extended through June 13—it will head to the Midwest, where it will be the inaugural show at the Lume Indianapolis, the first permanent digital art exhibit space in the United States. Later this fall, it will open at George W. Vanderbilt’s historic Biltmore house in Asheville and run through the Christmas season and into 2022.

St. Petersburg, Florida
When: November 21, 2020–June 13, 2021
Where: The Dalí Museum
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $25 ($10 for children 6-12), thedali.org.

Indianapolis
When: June 2021–TBD
Where: The Lume Indianapolis at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
Buy Tickets: Ticket sale dates have yet to be announced. For more information, visit discovernewfields.org/lume.

Denver
When: July 9–September 26, 2021
Where: The Hangar at Stanley Marketplace
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $35 ($25 for children 5-18), denvercenter.org.

Asheville, North Carolina
When: November 5, 2021–March 5, 2022
Where: The Biltmore
Buy Tickets: Tickets with required reservations will be available later this year and will be included with regular daytime admission to the Biltmore House via biltmore.com.

4. Beyond Van Gogh: An Immersive Experience
Created by French Canadian creative director Mathieu St-Arnaud and the team at the Montreal-based Normal Studio, Beyond Van Gogh is opening this spring at Miami’s Ice Palace Studios, just south of the Wynwood Arts District. This exhibit features voice-overs of van Gogh’s words set to a symphonic score to drive the narrative of the show as it progresses through 300 of his masterpieces including Starry Night, Sunflowers, and Café Terrace at Night.

Miami
When: April 15–July 11, 2021
Where: Ice Palace Studios
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $37 ($24 for children 5–15), vangoghmiami.com.

Austin
When: June 18–August 8, 2021
Where: Starry Night Pavilion at Circuit of The Americas
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $47 ($29 for children 5–15), vangoghaustin.com.

Detroit
When: June 28–August 15, 2021
Where: TCF Center
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $33 ($24 for children 5–15), vangoghdetroit.com.

Milwaukee
When: July 9–September 19, 2021
Where: Wisconsin Center
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $43 ($28 for children 5–15), vangoghmilwaukee.com.

5. Imagine Van Gogh: The Immersive Exhibition
Imagine Van Gogh is the creation of French artistic directors Annabelle Mauger and Julien Baron, who have worked on other immersive shows at the digital art museum in Les Baux-de-Provence, France. After stints in Vancouver and Edmonton, Canada, Imagine Van Gogh will come to the United States in December for shows in Boston and Tacoma/Seattle, featuring 200 van Gogh paintings set to the music of Saint-Saëns, Mozart, and Bach.

Tacoma/Seattle
When: December 18, 2021–January 30, 2022
Where: Tacoma Armory
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $41 ($36 for children 4–10), with group and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, tacoma.imagine-vangogh.com.

Boston
When: December 21, 2021–February 20, 2022
Where: SoWa Power Station
Buy Tickets: Prices start at $40 ($35 for children 6–10), with group and flexible tickets available in addition to the standard timed ticket options, boston.imagine-vangogh.com.





This article was originally published on March 2, 2021; it was updated on April 20, 2021, and again on May 3, 2021, with additional information.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

 

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