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Author Topic: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)  (Read 11507 times)

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patrick jane

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #221 on: June 02, 2021, 08:08:21 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2021/may/good-samaritan-and-vaccines.html







The Good Samaritan and Vaccines








Quantifying the most vulnerable among us and choosing to not walk by.


Over the past month, I have been burdened by what I’m hearing coming out of some Evangelical circles regarding COVID-19 vaccinations. While I can understand some reasons for vaccination hesitation, I am disturbed by others—some as extreme as the vaccination being the Mark of the Beast, but also just widespread disinformation posted online by evangelicals. Spreading false information is not just unhelpful, but, as far as I’m concerned, harmful. So, to be clear. I am an advocate for COVID-19 vaccinations. That’s why I’m grateful for voices like Dr. Smith and her article below.

I got into the field of epidemiology because I see it as the science of the Good Samaritan – of quantifying the most vulnerable among us, those on the margins, through population-level data, and choosing not to walk by.

For months now, I’ve been writing about the pandemic from the perspective of an epidemiologist, a pastor’s wife, and a Christian on my social media blog called Friendly Neighbor Epidemiologist. “Friendly” because I like to help and talk, maybe too much at times. “Neighbor” because I knew from the beginning that a virus-like COVID-19 would require us to take the notion of ‘love thy neighbor’ seriously. COVID-19’s nasty way of spreading prior to knowing you’re sick and highly contagious nature makes it a key example for an epidemiologist of how an individual’s behaviors impact the population’s health. In other words, we are all connected and depend on one another with this type of virus.

What I have seen over the past year is that dependency becomes marred with messy threads of Christian nationalism cloaked in “faith over fear,” individualistic definitions of freedoms and allegiances, racism, privilege, and power. Although we know who the most vulnerable are to COVID-19, the consequences of what I wrote in the previous sentence have resulted in many simply walking by.

Now, through extraordinary scientific efforts built over decades of work, we finally have life-saving vaccines that enable us to strive for herd immunity and find our way out of this pandemic. Yes, vaccines are about protecting us as individuals. But, more importantly, as Christians, they help protect others. Equivalent to masks, distancing, and other precautions, vaccines are a tangible way to ‘love thy neighbor’ and show solidarity to those around us – especially the vulnerable. That’s the point of herd immunity—of getting to a point with a disease where the masses protect the margins. In our Good Samaritan story, vaccines are another way for us to choose not to walk by. This is where we run into a challenge (or opportunity, depending on your vantage point).

Because of these vaccines, we in the US are starting to feel as if “normalcy” is within reach. That’s not the case everywhere, though. Higher-income countries have gobbled up 80% of the world’s vaccines with only 0.3% going to low-income countries. Global cases are accelerating more than we have seen over the past year. The pandemic is estimated to double the number at risk of starvation and push an additional 42-66 million children into extreme poverty, with the poorest countries impacted the most.

In the United States, food insecurity has doubled from 10% of all US households to 23%, with children being 1.5 times more likely to bear this burden. Why do I bring up stats and numbers? Because they represent the margins. These are the same countries and communities that do not have equitable vaccine access and are being slammed with COVID-19 case rates. And the margins matter to God.

From the beginning, God gave special instructions to His people to not hoard and to leave enough food for sojourners in the land. If you trace that thread through the rest of the story, you’ll hear about the margins again from the prophets in Isaiah’s proclamation that true fasting and obedience is sharing, clothing, providing, not turning away and as Amos’ harkening in the songs of justice rolling down like a river, righteousness like a never-ending stream. Then we finally get to Jesus bursting on the scene in his opening sermon: “For the Spirit of the Lord has anointed me to preach good news to the poor, proclaiming liberty to the captives” (Luke 4:18).

Let’s trace that same freedom sentiment through the Apostle Paul’s words in Galatians, “It is for [that] freedom we have been set free” to do what the entire law can be summed up in – “Love your neighbor as yourself”. And again, to the Corinthian church, “At the present time, your plenty will supply what they need so that in turn their plenty will supply what you need. The goal is equality.”

Why is this talked about so much in scripture? If the foot of the Cross is equal ground for all, why talk so much about the margins, about wealth, and sharing? Perhaps because God knew we would need to be continually reminded that His economy works differently than ours does. I think He also probably knew we would have a hard time doing that with our proclivity toward individualistic thinking. “Did God really say?...” is a strong pull for all of us and can easily excuse a me-first mentality for individuals and systems.

In God’s global economy, however, there’s no scarcity or myopic mentalities. There’s not only an equal distribution of provisions, but there’s also more than enough because we have a God who can make all things abound at all times, who can do more than we can ever ask or imagine, and who can send fed people home with a multiplied basket of bread and fish. He is a God of just distribution and overabundance-enoughness. That’s the system He designed. But, in a world that fails to live by these ideals, our God has a particular concern for the margins.

This brings me back to vaccines and the Good Samaritan story. I think Jesus knew we would need a story that forces us to see humanity through the lens of the Cross where all are equal – all nations, countries, people. That Cross now commissions us as ambassadors and His workmanship to make that holy work a reality.

That lens helps us see where that equity is lacking (kind of like an epidemiologist) in the here-and-not-yet. Then we have a choice. Do we walk by? Do we understand when we feed the hungry, clothe the needy, take care of the sick, get our vaccines and advocate for just distribution for our global neighbors, we not only participate in God’s economy of abundance— we say a resounding ‘yes and amen’ to the God of multiplied baskets, rivers of justice, and herd immunity.

We do not walk by.

God has always been about the margins. I want to be too.








Emily R. Smith, Ph.D., MSPH is currently an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at Baylor University with research areas of epidemiology, global health, global surgery, pediatrics, and health concerns. Dr. Smith has previous professional experience as an Adjunct Professor of Global Health, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University.

patrick jane

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #222 on: June 03, 2021, 11:32:48 am »
I'M BACK! The Fight Against Big Tech Continues as Fauci's Emails Drop | Louder with Crowder


Crowder is BACK on YouTube, and Big Tech doesn’t know what’s coming for it. We take another look at Fauci’s emails. These managed to be worse than the day before. Also, we expose the TRUTH on why Democrats want to abolish to filibuster. All while we kick off CULTURAL APPROPRIATION MONTH by saluting Japan!


1 hour
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzatLgoeAlM

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #223 on: June 03, 2021, 06:45:43 pm »
I'M BACK! The Fight Against Big Tech Continues as Fauci's Emails Drop | Louder with Crowder


Crowder is BACK on YouTube, and Big Tech doesn’t know what’s coming for it. We take another look at Fauci’s emails. These managed to be worse than the day before. Also, we expose the TRUTH on why Democrats want to abolish to filibuster. All while we kick off CULTURAL APPROPRIATION MONTH by saluting Japan!


1 hour
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzatLgoeAlM

Alright!---go get'em Crowder


Blade
1 Cor 15:3-4.."For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures; And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the scriptures:"

Acts 17:11.."These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so."

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #224 on: June 05, 2021, 05:46:08 pm »
How Movies Prepared Us For Coronavirus



In moments of crisis like this one, it helps to look to our favorite stories for ways to cope. Let’s see how film helps us understand what it means to be alone, how to hold leaders accountable, and what we can do to protect one another.


8 minutes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HoL9uH0XSAY

patrick jane

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #225 on: June 17, 2021, 03:11:05 pm »
Dr. Fauci Says The Risks From The Delta Variant Underscore The Importance Of Vaccines


https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/06/17/1007493934/the-delta-variant-is-the-most-contagious-of-covid-19-strains



The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has declared that the variant of coronavirus first detected in India is a variant of concern, meaning it poses a significant threat to those who are not vaccinated.

The Delta variant, also known as B.1.617.2, is the most contagious yet. The CDC estimates that it may be responsible for nearly 10% of all new COVID-19 infections in the United States. In some Western U.S. states, the variant may be responsible for nearly 20% of cases.

That risk has public health officials stressing the benefits of vaccines, which have been shown to be highly effective against the Delta variant. In one recent study, researchers in the U.K. found that a two-dose regimen of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was 88% effective against symptomatic disease from the Delta variant.

"If you are vaccinated, you're going to be protected, which is another very good reason to encourage people strongly to get vaccinated," says Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "If you are not vaccinated, you are at risk of getting infected with the virus that now spreads more rapidly and gives more serious disease."

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition on Thursday, Fauci elaborated on what led the CDC to designate the Delta variant a variant of concern, what the science says so far about how long protection lasts from vaccines and whether he's worried about a new surge.

Here are highlights of the conversation, edited in parts for clarity and length.

Interview Highlights
On what prompted the CDC to elevate the Delta variant to a new level of concern

Some studies have recently come out essentially documenting that indeed, this particular variant does transmit significantly more readily between people and among people than the virus that is now the dominant virus, which is the Alpha variant, which is the one that's more dominant in the United States. In addition, a very recent data — literally yesterday and the day before — shows that, in fact, it is a more dangerous virus in the sense that it can potentially make people more severely ill. So the combination of more transmissibility and a greater severity of disease appropriately prompted the CDC to elevate it to a variant of concern.

On his concerns that the variant could make people more sick as COVID-19 restrictions are lifted nationwide

I'm not concerned about the people who are vaccinated because the good news about all this among the seriousness of the situation with regard to the variant is that the vaccines work really quite well. A recent study came out showing that against any clinical disease with 617, which is the Delta variant, that the efficacy or the effectiveness is somewhere close to 90% — 88, 89, 90%. Importantly, the protection against severe disease resulting in hospitalization and death is over 90%, 93, 94%. So if you are vaccinated, you're going to be protected, which is another very good reason to encourage people strongly to get vaccinated, because if you are not vaccinated, you are at risk of getting infected with the virus that now spreads more rapidly and gives more serious disease. The Brits are having a very difficult time with this. They have about 90 plus percent of their isolates are the Delta. As you mentioned correctly just a moment ago, about 10% of our isolates are Delta. We want to make sure we don't get into the same situation that people in the U.K. did.

On what we know now about how long vaccine protection lasts

We don't know for sure. We certainly know that it's several months up to a year, because people who have been vaccinated early on, the original people who were vaccinated, seemed to continue to have protection. What we do is we monitor cohorts of people who have been in clinical trial, both for laboratory indication of durability, of protection, as well as clinical indication. For example, if we start seeing breakthrough infections, there's a thing called correlate of immunity, which is a laboratory test that you could follow. And as that goes below a certain threshold, then you know you're going to have to give someone a booster. So we're preparing to boost people, but we don't know at exactly what point we will have to do that. But we're doing tests right now, clinical trials to determine various options for boosting people.

The federal government has agreed to buy 200 million more doses of the Moderna vaccine to prepare for necessity for boosters. Can you explain how that will work?

It's going to be a combination of the need — potential need — for boosters, but also for the pediatric population, because as you know now, we've shown that at least with one candidate and likely more to come, that 12 to 15 year olds can be vaccinated. We are doing studies now to determine the proper dosage and the proper regimen for children from 12 to nine, and then nine to six and then six to two. So we have the, I wouldn't say challenge, but at least facing ahead for the likelihood — of more than just the likelihood, I'm sure we'll be doing it — of vaccinating children as well as possibly needing to give people boosters. They'll be a varying requirement for boosters. For example, it is likely that the elderly who have less of a powerful immune system than people who are younger, those people would likely need a booster longer than that. So we're looking at this. Hopefully we'll get the right answer, which I believe we will and will be prepared for it.

Right now, 51% of eligible peaceful people nationwide are fully vaccinated. But we're seeing people traveling. Could we see another surge?

Well, not among vaccinated people. You know, we have a disparity throughout the country. Certain states have low level. They will be at risk.

The audio for this story was produced and edited by Nina Kravinsky and Jill Craig.



truthjourney

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #226 on: June 17, 2021, 06:28:08 pm »
Dr. Fauci Says The Risks From The Delta Variant Underscore The Importance Of Vaccines


https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/06/17/1007493934/the-delta-variant-is-the-most-contagious-of-covid-19-strains



The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has declared that the variant of coronavirus first detected in India is a variant of concern, meaning it poses a significant threat to those who are not vaccinated.

The Delta variant, also known as B.1.617.2, is the most contagious yet. The CDC estimates that it may be responsible for nearly 10% of all new COVID-19 infections in the United States. In some Western U.S. states, the variant may be responsible for nearly 20% of cases.

That risk has public health officials stressing the benefits of vaccines, which have been shown to be highly effective against the Delta variant. In one recent study, researchers in the U.K. found that a two-dose regimen of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was 88% effective against symptomatic disease from the Delta variant.

"If you are vaccinated, you're going to be protected, which is another very good reason to encourage people strongly to get vaccinated," says Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "If you are not vaccinated, you are at risk of getting infected with the virus that now spreads more rapidly and gives more serious disease."

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition on Thursday, Fauci elaborated on what led the CDC to designate the Delta variant a variant of concern, what the science says so far about how long protection lasts from vaccines and whether he's worried about a new surge.

Here are highlights of the conversation, edited in parts for clarity and length.

Interview Highlights
On what prompted the CDC to elevate the Delta variant to a new level of concern

Some studies have recently come out essentially documenting that indeed, this particular variant does transmit significantly more readily between people and among people than the virus that is now the dominant virus, which is the Alpha variant, which is the one that's more dominant in the United States. In addition, a very recent data — literally yesterday and the day before — shows that, in fact, it is a more dangerous virus in the sense that it can potentially make people more severely ill. So the combination of more transmissibility and a greater severity of disease appropriately prompted the CDC to elevate it to a variant of concern.

On his concerns that the variant could make people more sick as COVID-19 restrictions are lifted nationwide

I'm not concerned about the people who are vaccinated because the good news about all this among the seriousness of the situation with regard to the variant is that the vaccines work really quite well. A recent study came out showing that against any clinical disease with 617, which is the Delta variant, that the efficacy or the effectiveness is somewhere close to 90% — 88, 89, 90%. Importantly, the protection against severe disease resulting in hospitalization and death is over 90%, 93, 94%. So if you are vaccinated, you're going to be protected, which is another very good reason to encourage people strongly to get vaccinated, because if you are not vaccinated, you are at risk of getting infected with the virus that now spreads more rapidly and gives more serious disease. The Brits are having a very difficult time with this. They have about 90 plus percent of their isolates are the Delta. As you mentioned correctly just a moment ago, about 10% of our isolates are Delta. We want to make sure we don't get into the same situation that people in the U.K. did.

On what we know now about how long vaccine protection lasts

We don't know for sure. We certainly know that it's several months up to a year, because people who have been vaccinated early on, the original people who were vaccinated, seemed to continue to have protection. What we do is we monitor cohorts of people who have been in clinical trial, both for laboratory indication of durability, of protection, as well as clinical indication. For example, if we start seeing breakthrough infections, there's a thing called correlate of immunity, which is a laboratory test that you could follow. And as that goes below a certain threshold, then you know you're going to have to give someone a booster. So we're preparing to boost people, but we don't know at exactly what point we will have to do that. But we're doing tests right now, clinical trials to determine various options for boosting people.

The federal government has agreed to buy 200 million more doses of the Moderna vaccine to prepare for necessity for boosters. Can you explain how that will work?

It's going to be a combination of the need — potential need — for boosters, but also for the pediatric population, because as you know now, we've shown that at least with one candidate and likely more to come, that 12 to 15 year olds can be vaccinated. We are doing studies now to determine the proper dosage and the proper regimen for children from 12 to nine, and then nine to six and then six to two. So we have the, I wouldn't say challenge, but at least facing ahead for the likelihood — of more than just the likelihood, I'm sure we'll be doing it — of vaccinating children as well as possibly needing to give people boosters. They'll be a varying requirement for boosters. For example, it is likely that the elderly who have less of a powerful immune system than people who are younger, those people would likely need a booster longer than that. So we're looking at this. Hopefully we'll get the right answer, which I believe we will and will be prepared for it.

Right now, 51% of eligible peaceful people nationwide are fully vaccinated. But we're seeing people traveling. Could we see another surge?

Well, not among vaccinated people. You know, we have a disparity throughout the country. Certain states have low level. They will be at risk.

The audio for this story was produced and edited by Nina Kravinsky and Jill Craig.

Fauci is a quack. And I've seen him doing the hidden hand Masonic thing. That right there is a huge RED FLAG not to listen to that man or take him seriously and certainly not to trust him. Hidden hand=hidden agenda. Need I say more?
Eph. 6:12 Because your fight has not been with flesh and blood, but with Principalities and The Rulers and The Powers of this dark world and with wicked spirits which are under Heaven.
1Tim. 4:1 Now the Spirit expressly states that in later times some will abandon the faith to follow deceitful spirits and the teachings of demons, 2 influenced by the hypocrisy of liars, whose consciences are seared with a hot iron.
2Tim. 3:1But understand this: In the last days terrible times will come. 2 For men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, 3 unloving, unforgiving, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, without love of good, 4 traitorous, reckless, conceited, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, 5having a form of godliness but denying its power. Turn away from such as these!

patrick jane

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patrick jane

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #228 on: August 05, 2021, 09:59:53 pm »
Silent Epidemic; The Untold Story of Vaccines Movie dire


1 HOUR 48 MINUTES
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1m3TjokVU4

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #229 on: September 15, 2021, 11:52:06 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/news/2021/september/christian-college-cccu-faith-covid-vaccine-ifyc.html








Evangelical Colleges Join Effort to Promote Faith in the Vaccine









A campaign to educate campuses about COVID-19 vaccination shifts from persuading the hesitant to making it easier for the willing.


Last week, as President Joe Biden was announcing a new vaccine mandate for large workplaces, students at more than 100 Christian colleges were trying to persuade their communities to get the shot voluntarily.

Since those between the ages of 18 and 29 are among the least likely to be hospitalized or to suffer serious illness or death due to COVID-19, swaths of young people didn’t get the shot as soon as it became available earlier in the year.

Dozens of evangelical schools belonging to the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) have joined an interfaith effort called Faith in the Vaccine, designed to recruit students and faculty to help inform their communities about vaccination and recognize the role religious identity might play in people’s hesitation.

“This was not about hounding people into getting the vaccine or shaming them if they were hesitant,” said Eboo Patel, founder of Interfaith Youth Corps (IFYC), which launched the effort last spring and has disbursed $4 million to fund the campaign so far. “It was very much about engaging with great respect and sensitivity … and helping them kind of talk their own way into vaccination.”

Nearly 50 CCCU member schools signed up for the program. IFYC, along with medical professionals from the Rush University Medical School, trained campus ambassadors in conversational tactics and medical information about the vaccines.

But what started out as a campaign to promote education around vaccination within these faith communities has shifted to efforts to actually get shots in arms. The Faith in the Vaccine ambassadors, according to IFYC, have helped promote or host hundreds of clinics and events across the country, accounting for an estimated 10,000 or more vaccinations.

Persuasion, not Pressure
Organizers saw the campaign as a way to make sure people had the information they needed around vaccination. Aaron Hinojosa, a faculty ambassador for the program at Azusa Pacific University, said participants aren’t using religion to pressure or shame people.

“It’s not to the point where it’s like, ‘You have to do it,’” Hinojosa said, “But, ‘Here’s what we know, here’s what it is, and you have to make a good, informed decision.’”

Some found the conversational approach was a little too hazy to be motivating.

“A lot of the goal, it seemed at beginning, was trying to have these conversations with people that are vaccine hesitant or vaccine rejectors, and almost change their minds,” said Joel Frees, faculty ambassador at Southern Nazarene University in Oklahoma.

He said it was difficult to find ways to encourage college students who saw that their age put them at a very low risk for severe illness. Frees said he struggled to energize his team of ambassadors over the summer, when outbreaks fell.

Hinojosa’s team at Azusa Pacific hadn’t reported much activity last spring, either, other than a series of Instagram Live videos about why they chose to get vaccinated and personal conversations between ambassadors and their loved ones.

Surveys conducted by IFYC along with the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tracked attitudes toward the vaccine. Between March and June, “vaccine refusal” held steady at around 14 percent, while vaccine hesitancy diminished from 28 percent of respondents to just 15 percent. So IFYC announced in July that instead of focusing on persuading the former, they’d work to help the latter.

The change in approach came just as the delta variant was emerging as the most active strain in the US. With delta, young people have suffered more than earlier in the pandemic; Americans under age 50 now account for roughly a third of COVID-19-positive patients in hospitals.

Campuses have seen delta’s impact in contrast to the earlier months of the pandemic. Several Christian colleges, including Liberty University and Cedarville University, had the first few weeks of the school year disrupted by outbreaks among the student body.

Few CCCU schools—including Seattle Pacific University and Pepperdine University—required vaccination for this school year, allowing for exemptions due to medical, religious, or philosophical reasons.

From Conversations to Clinics
According to PRRI’s survey, the three most-cited reasons among all Americans for not yet getting vaccinated were the inability to get time off of work, trouble finding childcare, and transportation issues.

After those survey results were in, Faith in the Vaccine ambassadors began working with local health departments and other institutions to host, organize, and publicize vaccine clinics.

Frees said Southern Nazarene’s ambassadors have worked with the Oklahoma City Health Department to host two vaccine clinics on campus, administering a total of 74 shots to mostly students. They’ve also hosted educational seminars for students about the vaccine and how it was developed.

Hinojosa at Azusa Pacific said ambassadors helped the university’s inconveniently located health department set up a temporary vaccine station in the middle of campus one day.

Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota, organized a mobile vaccine clinic for local migrant workers who may not have been able to access the vaccine otherwise, Patel said.

PRRI found in March that Hispanic Protestants were the most hesitant to get vaccinated, followed by white evangelicals. Some ambassadors reported the hesitation about getting the vaccine among the Latino community stems from fear that if they show up at a clinic, their immigration status may be exposed.

At an online rally this week, IFYC shared several video testimonies from other Faith in the Vaccine student ambassadors about their successes.

In one video, Tori Wootan from University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio said they’d hosted a clinic in the tiny nearby town of Natalia—population 1,200—where 56 people were vaccinated.

Irene Kuriakose from Queens University in Charlotte, North Carolina, said her group encouraged community members to get vaccinated by giving away grocery gift cards and raffle tickets for a $500 prize. Others set up information tables with swag outside popular campus events, like move-in week or athletic competitions.

“You’d be surprised how many people are interested in scheduling or reporting their vaccines if you provide them a super cool bucket hat,” said Anu Agbi, student ambassador at Baylor University.

At Emory University in Atlanta, Rachel Lewis said a homeless man had been hanging around multiple vaccine clinics, where ambassadors were also handing out hygiene items and toiletries. At the fourth clinic, he finally agreed to get the vaccine.

“We’ve been able to provide a lot of vaccines to a lot of people, and our community members now trust us,” Lewis said.

Patel said sharing these stories at their rally this week was a way to motivate Faith in the Vaccine teams across the country to continue their “fall push.” It’s up to IFYC donors now, he said, to continue funding the program into the winter and spring.

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #230 on: September 15, 2021, 11:56:36 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/news/2021/september/religious-exemption-covid-vaccine-employer-mandate-biden.html








Religious Exemption Requests Spike as Employers Mandate Vaccine






Some white evangelicals, the faith group most likely to refuse to get the shot, join thousands in citing “sincerely held” religious beliefs.


About 3,000 Los Angeles Police Department employees are citing religious objections to try to get out of the required COVID-19 vaccination. In Washington state, hundreds of state workers are seeking similar exemptions. And an Arkansas hospital has been swamped with so many such requests from employees that it is apparently calling their bluff.

Religious objections, once used sparingly around the country to get exempted from various required vaccines, are becoming a much more widely used loophole against the COVID-19 shot.

And it is only likely to grow following President Joe Biden’s sweeping new vaccine mandates covering more than 100 million Americans, including executive branch employees and workers at businesses with more than 100 people on the payroll.

The administration acknowledges that some small minority of Americans will use—and some may seek to exploit—religious exemptions. But it said it believes even marginal improvements in vaccination levels will save lives.

It’s not clear yet how many federal employees have requested a religious exemption. The Labor Department has said an accommodation can be denied if it causes an undue burden.

In the states, mask and vaccine requirements vary, but most offer exemptions for certain medical conditions or religious or philosophical objections. The use of such exemptions, particularly by parents on behalf of their schoolchildren, has been growing over the past decade.

The allowance was enshrined in the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, which says employers must make reasonable accommodations for employees who object to work requirements because of “sincerely held” religious beliefs.

A religious belief does not have be recognized by an organized religion, and it can be new, unusual or “seem illogical or unreasonable to others,” according to rules laid out by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. But it can’t be founded solely on political or social ideas.

That puts employers in the position of determining what is a legitimate religious belief and what is a dodge.

Many major religious denominations have no objections to the COVID-19 vaccines. But the rollout has prompted heated debates because of the longtime role that cell lines derived from fetal tissue have played, directly or indirectly, in the research and development of various vaccines and medicines.

Roman Catholic leaders in New Orleans and St. Louis went so far to call Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 shot “morally compromised.” J&J has stressed that there is no fetal tissue in its vaccine.

Moreover, the Vatican’s doctrine office has said it is “morally acceptable” for Catholics to receive COVID-19 vaccines that are based on research that used cells derived from aborted fetuses. Pope Francis himself has said it would be “suicide” not to get the shot.

In New York, state lawmakers attempted to make the vaccine mandatory for medical workers, with no religious exemptions. On Tuesday, a federal judge blocked the rule because it lacked the opt-out.

An August AP-NORC poll found that 58 percent of white evangelical Protestants, 72 percent of white mainline Protestants, 80 percent of Catholics and 73 percent of Americans who are religiously unaffiliated say they have been vaccinated. Seventy percent of nonwhite Protestants say they have been, including 70 percent of Black Protestants.

Among white evangelical Protestants, the religious group least likely to have been vaccinated, 33 percent say they will not get the shot.

Across the US, public officials, doctors, and community leaders have been trying to help people circumvent COVID-19 mask and vaccine requirements.

In Tulsa, Oklahoma, pastor Jackson Lahmeyer is offering a “religious exemption” form on his church’s website for download, along with links for suggested donations to the church. The 29-year-old is running for the US Senate.

Anyone interested can get the form signed by a religious leader. He said on Twitter that more than 14,000 people have downloaded it. He wrote that what was amazing was “how many pastors refuse to sign the form for members in their church.” He said he can sign if someone joins the church and donates.

But obtaining a religious exemption is not as simple as producing a signed form from a religious leader. Measles outbreaks in schools over the past decade prompted some states to change their policies. Some now require an actual signed affidavit from a religious leader, instead of an online form. California got rid of nonmedical exemptions in 2015.

Erika Cole, a Maryland-based attorney who serves as a senior editorial advisor with ChurchLawAndTax.com, a CT sister site, previously told CT employers shouldn’t require church leaders to verify religious exemptions.

“Currently, there are two legally recognized exemptions from a mandatory vaccination: medical reasons and sincerely held religious beliefs. When presented with notice of a religious exemption, some employers have requested the employee provide support from the church he/she attends. This, of course, is troublesome for a number of reasons,” Cole said. “…according to the EEOC, the individual, not the church he or she attends, holds the ‘sincerely held religious belief’ that may be the basis for refusing vaccination. As such, it is the individual’s right to advise his/her employer of that belief, and not a requirement of the church he/she may attend.”

Some private employers are taking a hard line. United Airlines told employees last week that those who obtain religious exemptions will be put on unpaid leave until new coronavirus testing procedures are in place.

In Los Angeles, Police Chief Michel Moore said he is waiting for guidance from the city’s personnel department regarding the exemptions. The city has mandated that municipal employees get vaccinated by Oct. 5 unless they are granted a medical or religious exemption. A group of LAPD employees is suing over the policy.

“I can’t and won’t comment on the sincerity level” of people claiming a religious exemption, the police chief said. “I don’t want to speculate. Religion in America has many different definitions.”

Ten LAPD employees have died of COVID-19, and thousands in the department have been infected.

In Washington state, approximately 60,000 state employees are subject to a mandate issued by Gov. Jay Inslee that they be fully vaccinated by Oct. 18 or lose their job, unless they obtain a medical or religious exemption and receive an accommodation that allows them to remain employees.

As of Tuesday, more than 3,800 workers had requested religious exemptions. So far, 737 have been approved, but officials stressed that an exemption does not guarantee continued employment.

Once the exemption is approved, each agency has to evaluate the employee’s position and whether the person can still do the job with an accommodation while ensuring a safe workplace. Seven accommodations so far have been granted.

Inslee spokeswoman Tara Lee said that the process “may help distinguish between a sincerely held personal belief and a sincerely held religious belief.”

In Arkansas, about 5 percent of the staff at the privately run Conway Regional Health System has requested religious or medical exemptions.

The hospital responded by sending employees a form that lists a multitude of common medicines—including Tylenol, Pepto-Bismol, Preparation H, and Sudafed—that it said were developed through the use of fetal cell lines.

The form asks people to sign it and attest that “my sincerely held religious belief is consistent and true and I do not use or will not use” any of the listed medications.

In a statement, Conway Regional Health President and CEO Matt Troup said: “Staff who are sincere … should have no hesitancy with agreeing to the list of medicines listed.”

patrick jane

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #231 on: September 19, 2021, 10:31:59 pm »
ENDURING THE PERSECUTION & PLAGUES WE WERE WARNED ABOUT



As prophecies are being fulfilled the world will continue to intensify its persecution against the elect. It's a tough new reality, but I am hearing testimonies from some of you that has given me a reminder of how the Father has always provided for those who love Him and keep his commands.



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patrick jane

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Re: Coronavirus hoax to declare martial law (FEMA)
« Reply #233 on: October 05, 2021, 06:17:47 pm »
BREAKING: Pfizer Scientists ENDORSE Natural Immunity EXPOSED by Veritas! | Louder with Crowder




Scientists from Pfizer said the quiet part out loud about natural immunity. We’ll explain why. Also, Joe Biden blames Republicans for his inflation. And the timing of yesterday's Facebook crash sure was coincidental ... #facebook #projectveritas #biden



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