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Author Topic: Christianity Today Magazine - June 2021  (Read 1043 times)

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patrick jane

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Re: Christianity Today Magazine - June 2021
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2021, 12:30:24 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2021/june-web-only/survival-resistance-evangelical-america-crawford-gribben.html








Meet the Conservative Evangelicals Practicing ‘Strategic Hibernation’ in the American Northwest





They might embrace their marginal status, but they don’t plan on staying marginal forever.


In September 2020, about 150 Christians gathered to stage an informal Psalm Sing in the parking lot of Moscow, Idaho’s city hall. They were there to protest the local mask mandate.

Five individuals were cited by police for violating the local order to wear masks, and two were arrested “for suspicion of resisting or obstructing an officer.” One of the event’s organizers was Douglas Wilson, pastor of Christ Church in Moscow, a 900-member congregation with historical connections to Christian Reconstructionism (also known as theonomy), a movement that hopes to see earthly society governed by biblical law. One month earlier on Twitter, Wilson had framed his concerns about the issue in revealing terms: “Too few see the masking orders for what they ultimately are. Our modern and very swollen state wants to get the largest possible number of people to get used to putting up with the most manifest lies.”

In Survival and Resistance in Evangelical America: Christian Reconstruction in the Pacific Northwest, historian Crawford Gribben recounts how in recent decades conservative evangelicals, inspired by assorted strands of theonomy and survivalism, came to settle in the Pacific Northwest. Gribben explores how this group of “born-again Protestants who embrace their marginal status” has thrived in the wilds of Idaho and adjoining states, proposing “strategies of survival, resistance, and reconstruction in evangelical America.”

Turning toward triumphalism

Gribben describes his book as a “social history of theological ideas” based on long-distance interviews of several subjects and in-person fieldwork. Rather than crafting a journalistic exposé or a theological critique, Gribben employs “biographical, institutional, or thematic” approaches.

Previous accounts of Christian Reconstructionists have tended to focus on these believers’ theocratic vision of a future Christian polity rather than their separation from mainstream society. Today, Gribben concludes, these practitioners of “strategies of hibernation” may no longer be as marginal as some have assumed. In a series of illuminating chapters, Gribben astutely examines the history of theonomist migration to the Northwest, the eschatological assumptions underlying the original Reconstructionist vision, theonomic political theory, the movement’s influential educational ideas, and its thoughtful and innovative use of publishing and electronic media.

For these theonomists, present-day survivalism is closely linked to a future reconstruction of a godly society and Christianity’s earthly triumph. Theonomy is a diverse theological movement, arising within a conservative Reformed milieu. Its central ideas were first articulated by Rousas John Rushdoony, a California-based Presbyterian pastor and the son of Armenian immigrants. Gary North, Rushdoony’s estranged son-in-law, is one of many to carry its banner forward into the 21st century. Although theonomy first gained notoriety through its bold application of Mosaic law to the existing political order, more recent adherents have often sanded down its sharp edges.

Among the most intriguing features of Reconstructionism is its view of human history as it relates to Christ’s second coming. For much of the 20th century, American evangelicals were mainly premillennialists, believing Jesus would return to earth before inaugurating a thousand-year reign of peace and prosperity (the Millennium). Premillennialism went hand in hand with pessimism about existing social conditions—if Christ needed to come before things would get better, then why waste much energy on making them better in the here and now? By the 1970s, works like Hal Lindsey’s best-selling The Late Great Planet Earth had popularized a premillennial eschatology that stressed cultural and moral decline and applied apocalyptic prophecies to the Cold War.

Rushdoony challenged this dominant paradigm in the early 1970s, shifting toward a postmillennial view that saw the earthly progress of Christianity as a precursor to Christ’s return. First in a biblical commentary and then in volume 1 of his magnum opus, the pretentiously titled The Institutes of Biblical Law, Rushdoony argued that most believers lacked faith in Christianity’s ultimate triumph. “The whole of Scripture,” he countered, “proclaims the certainty of God’s victory in time and in eternity” (emphasis mine). The saints were called upon to fight for a Christian society here and now, and their victory in this world was assured.

The unalloyed triumphalism of Reconstructionism appealed to some disheartened evangelicals. Douglas Wilson’s evolving theology was shaped by Rushdoony’s postmillennial vision, although he has subtly distanced himself from the more extreme aspects of Rushdoony’s application of ancient Israel’s legal code. Because of years of hard work by Wilson and his followers, Gribben argues, “Moscow may now be America’s most postmillennial town,” with two large, thriving Reconstructionist congregations and members who play important roles in the town’s social and economic life.

In his chapter on the Reconstructionist understanding of government, Gribben carefully examines the historical origins of the movement’s odd coupling of Old Testament legal codes and libertarian politics. While other evangelicals were being drawn to Barry Goldwater’s 1964 presidential campaign, Rushdoony began working for the conservative William Volker Charities Fund. The Fund played a key role in getting libertarian economist Friedrich Hayek appointed to the faculty of the University of Chicago, and it embraced Hayek’s anti-statism.

While Rushdoony advocated the adoption of Mosaic civil law in a reconstructed Christian political order (including stoning those who engaged in homosexual behavior or disrespected their parents), he also embraced a small-government model that would have warmed the heart of Thomas Jefferson. Theonomy’s focus on Old Testament regulations has had little impact on conservative public policy, but Rushdoony and North’s tireless efforts to reconcile Christian principles with libertarian governing philosophies have been quite influential among some Christian conservatives.

Reconstructionists have also shaped evangelical educational theory. Rushdoony first gained attention with his forceful critique of public education. Inspired by theologian Cornelius Van Til’s argument that a neutral philosophical perspective was impossible and that secular and Christian approaches were fundamentally incompatible, Rushdoony advocated Christian alternatives.

By the 1990s, Wilson had become a widely acknowledged authority on homeschooling, promoting a classical curriculum based loosely on Dorothy Sayers’s previously neglected essay, The Lost Tools of Learning (1947). Moreover, Wilson helped found both a seminary and a small residential liberal arts college (ambitiously christened New Saint Andrews) in Moscow. Pacific Northwest theonomists separated themselves from the public school system as part of their strategy to transform society at large. “Before we can enlist in the culture war,” Wilson commented, “we have to have a culture. And that culture must be Christian.”

To promote their educational ideas and socially conservative vision, Wilson and company have creatively used both conventional book publishing (establishing Canon Press) and the internet. Behind all these ambitious efforts is the ultimate goal of cultural renewal or reconstruction. As the community’s organ, Credenda Agenda, put it bluntly, publishing “is warfare.” This campaign included a well-publicized series of debates between Wilson and atheist journalist Christopher Hitchens in 2009 over whether Christianity has been good for the world. (Gribben mentions the interaction with Hitchens at least five times.)

Gribben’s study is a welcome contribution to our understanding of the theonomist movement. His dispassionate, non-alarmist account allows the participants to speak for themselves. Occasionally, however, Gribben seems reluctant to pursue more searching questions, and his appraisal can sometimes be muted. It provides little comfort, for instance, when Gribben reassures readers that while Rushdoony “may not have approved of democracy,” he didn’t actually “approve of its violent subversion.” Allowing subjects to speak for themselves can periodically wander toward accepting their self-portraits. Still, Gribben handles complex cultural and theological questions deftly and with admirable sensitivity.

Two questions
Survival and Resistance in Evangelical America raises a host of fascinating questions that no single work of this sort can answer. Two such questions spring to mind.

First, despite all their dismissals of benighted pietism, isn’t it ironic that Rushdoony, North, and Wilson all ended up following 20th-century evangelicals in disparaging state intervention and embracing libertarianism? Despite the theonomists’ reverence for the Puritans, libertarian assumptions appear to trump the Puritans’ focus on the common good and their conception of the state as a moral agent. As such, their theonomy appears to owe more to Rand Paul than to, say, the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s first governor, John Winthrop. In this sense, is it really accurate to affirm, as Gribben does, that “the Moscow community … has successfully resisted American modernity”?

Second, and more broadly, while theonomy has certainly proven influential in ways unrecognized by scholars, just how seriously should Christians take its theological and social project? Evangelicals can sometimes be taken in by the appearance of scholarship. Answering those who claimed theonomists were weighty thinkers, former First Things editor Richard John Neuhaus once commented acerbically:

One might object that the argumentation of the theonomists is more often obsessive and fevered than well-reasoned, and the pedantry of bloated footnoting should not be mistaken for scholarship. One may also be permitted to doubt whether there is, in the explosion of theonomic writing, one major new idea or finding that anyone outside theonomy’s presuppositional circle need feel obliged to take seriously.

Though downplayed by Gribben, Rushdoony’s circle of fellow travelers should give any thoughtful Christian considerable pause. To note only a few red flags: In the first volume of his Institutes, Rushdoony appeared to flirt with Holocaust denial. Years later, he promoted the work of a writer who endorsed geostationary theory, which denies that the earth orbits around the sun. Gary North was among the most alarmist and apocalyptic of the Y2K prophets—at least until the clock struck midnight at the close of 1999. More recently, Wilson authored a booklet, Black & Tan, that adopted discredited Lost Cause views regarding secession and described the allegedly benign features of antebellum slavery. It is easy (especially in the age of Twitter) to confuse quantity with quality and strong opinions with wisdom.

Biographer Michael McVicar once speculated that Rushdoony was “one of the most frequently cited intellectuals of the American right.” Survival and Resistance in Evangelical America provides an insightful exploration of the larger social and regional contexts inhabited by Rushdoony’s offspring. While strict theonomists remain comparatively few, their influence has been significant in some surprising places. Lamentably, they have usually championed an approach more narrowly ideological than genuinely scriptural.






Gillis J. Harp teaches history at Grove City College. He is the author of Protestants and American Conservatism: A Short History.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


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Re: Christianity Today Magazine - June 2021
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2021, 01:40:42 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/news/2021/june/evangelical-support-bennett-netanyahu-israel-prime-minister.html








US Evangelicals Promise Prayers and Support for Israel’s New Prime Minister











Letter welcomes Benjamin Netanyahu’s successor after Friends of Zion founder pledged to oppose the incoming leader.


A diverse group of American evangelicals congratulated Naftali Bennett on becoming the new prime minister of Israel and successfully forming a coalition government, offering reassurance on to Israelis concerned about Christian support after Benjamin Netanyahu’s departure.

“We pray that God grants you wisdom and strength as you make hard decisions that will affect the lives of millions, and we trust that He will answer those prayers,” wrote more than 80 religious leaders, organized by the Philos Project, a group promoting “positive Christian engagement” with Israel and pluralism in the Middle East.

The letter expressed appreciation for Netanyahu and everything he did “to strengthen Israel and its alliances” over the past 12 years he served as prime minister. It also welcomed the change brought by Bennett, a religious Jew and former Netanyahu disciple who formed an alliance with multiple parties across the political spectrum to oust Netanyahu.

“We want to thank you in advance for protecting our shared values as they apply to Israel’s citizens, whether Jews, Christians, Muslims, or Druze; for guarding the holy sites and welcoming religious pilgrims from around the world to discover the birthplace of their faith; for defending Israel from outside aggression; and for continuing to work toward peace with Israel’s neighbors,” the letter said. “In return, we pledge to deepen our friendship with your country and its wonderful people.”

Some Israeli political commentators have worried about evangelical support for the new government. In the run-up to the election, former Israeli ambassador to the US Ron Dermer argued Israel should be very concerned about losing the support of American evangelicals.

Those fears seemed to be confirmed when Mike Evans, founder of the Jerusalem-based Friends of Zion Heritage Center and the Jerusalem Prayer Team, lambasted Bennett in an open letter.

The Jerusalem Prayer Team’s Facebook page had 77 million followers before it was taken down in May, and Evans is regularly described in Israeli media as a prominent American evangelical leader and even the “world’s largest evangelical leader.”

“Shame, shame, shame on you. Don't ever call yourself a defender of Zion. You're not,” Evans wrote to Bennett in early June, while Bennett was negotiating to form a coalition government.

“I will fight you every step of the way. You have lost the support of evangelicals 100 percent,” Evans said. “We gave you four years of miracles under Donald Trump. We evangelicals delivered it. You delivered nothing. What appreciation do you show us? You s— right on our face.”

Evans later apologized for using rude language, but repeated his opposition to Bennett and any other political figures who might attempt to replace Netanyahu.

“You’re gonna wave a white flag of surrender—not a blue and white flag—a white flag, because you’re so blinded by your hatred, by your petty politics and your obsessions with power that you can’t see the trees for the forest,” he said.

Evans also reiterated his claim to represent American evangelicals, and referred to “my 77 million evangelicals” in his press conference.

Other American evangelicals with a record of strong support for Israel stepped in to say that not everyone felt the same as Evans.

“While Evangelicals do highly respect and appreciate Netanyahu, their love for Israel is not tied to one man,” wrote Joel Rosenberg, a Christian fiction author and founder of All Israel News. “Christians of course know that at some point Netanyahu will move on, but they sincerely want to bless and strengthen Israel for the long haul regardless of who is in power.”

Rosenberg is one of the dozens of leaders who signed the Philos Project letter.

It was also signed by Methodist, Pentecostal, Southern Baptist, and Missionary Baptist pastors; bishops in the Anglican Church in North America and the International Pentecostal Holiness Church; and representatives from the National Day of Prayer Task Force, the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, National Religious Broadcasters, Pastors Wives of America, and Promise Keepers.

Professors from The King’s College, Grove City College, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dickerson-Green Theological Seminary, and Beeson Divinity School signed on, as did Tony Suarez and Johnnie Moore, who served as evangelical advisors to President Donald Trump.

Robert Nicholson, president of The Philos Project, said in a statement that the letter was designed to show broad support.

“This list represents tens of millions of Christians from all over the denominational spectrum,” he said, “who differ on many things but agree on the importance of Christian friendship with Israel based on shared values that come from the Bible.”
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


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Re: Christianity Today Magazine - June 2021
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2021, 10:16:41 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2021/june/renewed-thinking-in-post-everything-society.html








Renewed Thinking in a Post-Everything Society




Finding fresh perspectives and methods for missions.


Paul exhorts believers, as they offer their bodies as living sacrifices, not to be conformed to the ways of the world but be transformed by the renewal of their minds. This way, they will discern the will of God.

There’s much to be said about, not to mention the application of, the truth contained in Romans 12:1–2. It could fill commentaries and books, which it has. One of the interesting takeaways from Romans 12 is that it proceeds a section of Paul’s letter where he noted his burning desire for Israel to know Christ. The salvation of God should naturally lead to the transformation of his people through a new (and renewed) understanding or way of thinking.

Sanctification is something that churches embrace and talk about—mainly in the context of individual sanctification. But just as individuals need sanctification, I would contend churches need to undergo corporate sanctification. In other words, just as individuals should continually be transformed in the image of Jesus, so too should churches be continually shaped as the body of Jesus.

I believe the 21st century, one in which is being defined as a post-everything world—post-modern, post-Christian, and [eventually] post-COVID-19—is challenging the church to be missionally transformed with a fresh perspective of mission, a new way of thinking with methods, and a renewed attitude of joy.

A Fresh Perspective of Mission


The church in the West has enjoyed home-field advantage for roughly 1700 years. In that time, mission has been somewhat easy. However, the loss of home-field advantage will mean mission and advancement of the gospel will be harder. This is the fresh perspective of mission the church will need to have.

What was easy about the mission when the church enjoyed home-field advantage? For starters, if you think of it in terms of the progression of the great commission (Jerusalem, Judea, Samaria, and uttermost parts of the earth) or Engel’s Scale of Evangelism, home-field advantage meant reaching a culture similar to a Christian worldview. That is no longer the case. Our culture has become more comprised of “Samaria” and the “uttermost parts of the world” or to put it in Engel’s language, they have “no effective (or defective) knowledge of Christianity.”

Now that we are the visiting team, we must understand mission will not be easy as it once was. Mission will not be as microwavable— simple. Mission will not be as marketable— enticing through slick sermon series. Mission will not be as meteoric— rapid multiplication.

In short, churches will need to receive a fresh perspective of mission by seeing it as a long-term investment rather than a short-term turnaround.

A New Way of Thinking with Methods
From the Industrial Revolution to the now Digital (or Technological) Revolution our culture has adapted to the various methods (tools or technologies) that facilitate a company, machine, or person’s purpose. From combines to computers, from trains to planes, different methods have been created to facilitate one’s mission.

When it comes to the mission of God being carried and advanced by the vehicle of his “C”hurch, there are a variety of ways to share and show the gospel of King Jesus. I know some may disagree, and it might be because of a difference in defining what God’s mission is. I see God’s mission as redeeming a people for himself from all peoples on planet earth through faith in Christ Jesus. And the way God accomplishes his mission is through the church as they share and show the gospel of King Jesus in the power of the Spirit. The demonstration of the gospel is as comprehensive as the Fall. In other words, as the Fall affected every sphere of life, so too will the gospel.

Therefore, a new way of thinking (which is not so new with many) with methods for the church in the 21st century will be “spheric.” In addition to seeing the church building or corporate worship gathering as the primary place of fulfilling God’s mission, churches will be thinking how they can equip and release individuals, offer corporate opportunities, and partner with (or create) institutions to engage all spheres within the community.

By engaging the spiritual, social, and cultural spheres of the community in individual, corporate, and institutional ways, the church (over time) offers a vision of the Kingdom Jesus inaugurated and will one day consummate. This is a new way of thinking with the methods that facilitate the mission.

A Renewed Attitude of Joy
When ministry and mission get tough, they tend to suck the life and joy out of leaders. I’m sure like you, I’ve enjoyed those seasons in ministry where everything was going well. Mission seemed to be fruitful, ministry was flourishing, and the church was in sound fellowship. Such an environment naturally breeds joy. But disrupt any of those things and it is easy to succumb to frustration and discouragement.

The further we move into the 21st century we will learn that the soil is not as fertile—and will have to work even harder to tend to and cultivate the soil. We will also continue to see the shrinking of cultural Christianity (or nominalism)—and will, in many cases, experience a more sporadic attendance of the faithful. We will continue to experience the waning of honor bestowed on church leaders—and at the same time will continue to receive contentious displeasures from people in our fold.

Neither ministry nor mission will be for the faint of heart. Nevertheless, in the difficulty, we must have a renewed attitude of joy—a joy that is experienced and expressed in all things. To do so, we must see mission and ministry the way Jesus saw the cross— “For the joy set before him, he endured the cross, scorning its shame…” (Heb 12:2).

In closing, pastors and church leaders, we will need renewed thinking in a post-everything society. May we not be conformed to the patterns of this world or the old patterns of Christendom, but through the power of the Spirit may we be transformed through a mind that receives a fresh perspective of mission, revisions our methods to accomplish the mission, and renews an attitude of joy.








Josh Laxton currently serves as the Assistant Director of the Wheaton College Billy Graham Center and Lausanne North American Wheaton College. He also serves part-time as the Young Adults/Teaching Pastor at Wheaton Bible Church in West Chicago, IL. He has a Ph.D. in North American Missiology from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


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Re: Christianity Today Magazine - June 2021
« Reply #16 on: June 28, 2021, 10:57:54 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2021/june/no-longer-evangelical.html








No Longer Evangelical









Is the label 'evangelical' sustainable for Christians in our post-everything world?


I became a Christian at the age of 20, while doing my honors work in philosophy at the University of Michigan. Up until that point, I was an atheist, being raised by atheists. My childhood home had a sign declaring, “The Moore’s, The Atheists,” and a barrel for Bible burning—seriously. That’s why when I converted to Christianity, I had nearly zero history with organized religion and was utterly unfamiliar with a great many terms and labels that came with my conversion.

One of the most important labels I inherited at the time was “evangelical.” I was told that was what I had become, an evangelical Christian. It seemed right to me, because, after all, I had not become a Catholic, Pentecostal, fundamentalist, or Orthodox Christian, I had become an “evangelical Christian,” and that meant something to me at the time.

At the time, as I learned about the ecosystem of the variety of Christian expressions, evangelicals cared deeply about intellectual engagement, spreading the message of Jesus to the world, working together to accomplish that mission, and had a commitment to personal spiritual transformation. That isn’t to say these hallmarks didn’t also present themselves in other forms of Christianity, but after my conversion in the early 1990s, I found them all to be replete within evangelicalism.

How has evangelicalism changed

At its core, evangelicalism is a global expression of Protestantism, which is patently “trans-denominational,” and fundamentally concerned with the spread of the Christian message through mission and evangelism. At its best, evangelicalism was a highly ecumenical movement that enjoyed a long era of engaging issues of social good and justice, intellectual and academic engagement, and a culturally sophisticated understanding of peoples and ethnic social capital. Through my commitment to the evangelical brand of Christianity, I spent nearly 20 years as an abolitionist, mobilizing state and federal lawmakers, faith communities, corporations, and hundreds of thousands of citizens in the fight against modern-day slavery. This was because of the brand of my Christian faith, but today, it is despite it.

Today, evangelicalism has devolved into a grasp for cultural and political superiority at any cost as we can see from its collapse into Christian nationalism. Today, evangelicalism is rife with conspiracy theories and an anti-intellectual, anti-scientific worldview. This collapse is simply the proof that evangelicalism went from hallowed to hollow somewhere along its way, and we are now just witnessing its inevitable demise. For most Americans, they’ve never known a world where evangelical was a term to be revered, even amongst its antagonists. For most, there have never been the “good old days of evangelicalism,” and that is part of the problem.

Evangelicalism is a shadow of what it used to be, offering little to the world it once cherished and lived in as a good global citizen. It is hard to break with one’s heritage—after all, it was evangelicals that first taught me, as a former atheist, to care for the environment, to fight for modern-day slaves, to believe in the power of science, to speak out for racial diversity and empowerment, and pursue a lifelong commitment to intellectual integrity.

These were some of the many reasons why I originally, proudly accepted this label for myself, but as my spiritual journey has evolved, I’ve increasingly kept my evangelical card-carrying identity close to the vest. Being an evangelical has become cumbersome and a source of embarrassment, always needing to be nuanced, contextualized, and qualified. “Well, I’m not that kind of evangelical,” or “Many evangelicals are like that, but not me.” For many, the term is synonymous with MAGA and Christian nationalism—a corruption of the ways of Jesus for sure. For many outsiders, the word evangelical summons amorphous images that are homophobic, misogynist, anti-scientific, and racist. The constant negotiating of the term evangelical has gone beyond tedious; it is clearly unsustainable. This is why I am no longer considering myself an evangelical Christian. I am no longer willing to participate in the charade of pretending that evangelicalism means what it meant.

Beyond faith labels
As I leave the faith tradition that has given me so much, I want to qualify what I mean when I say I’m no longer an evangelical. I will always be Christian, but no longer of the evangelical variety, primarily because I don’t see how evangelicalism can ever be salvaged from what it has become. Today, to be an evangelical in the minds of our society is to be an enemy of the ways of Jesus. To be sure, there are millions of Christians who still don the name ‘evangelical’ who are passionately and unswervingly following the ways of Jesus but under the banner of that label are doing so to their detriment. We are in desperate need of a new expression of Christianity—an expression that creates space for a new way forward.

The ways and teachings of Jesus were radically incompatible with many of the aspects of the mainstream culture of His day, things like misogyny, elitism, and the oppression of the immigrant. One needs only to read one of the four biblical gospel accounts to see that the good news Jesus announced envisioned a new normal that would dismantle many of the powers and privileges of the elite. For many American evangelicals, these are the same powers and privileges they seek to control and benefit from through their use and abuse of political power and cultural echoes from past eras when evangelicalism had a much bigger megaphone than it does today. American Evangelicalism, as it now stands, is quickly becoming synonymous with the very culture and power systems Jesus Himself sought to dismantle!

I am no longer an evangelical, but I am a Christian. In abandoning my evangelical faith tradition, I am sure I will cross and disappoint many who are still desperately trying to redeem and defend the term. But let’s be honest it is a lost cause. We have gone too far, made way too many compromises, and cashed in what little equity we had left in evangelicalism during these last four years. My call is for others to do the same: to denounce what evangelicalism has become and re-embrace the radical ways of Jesus. For millions of church-going, Bible-reading, sincerely praying Americans, who love God and their neighbor, we are not helped by continuing to own this bankrupt label. What our world needs in this time of healing are women and men who are committed to justice, peace, equity, and, most of all, love. This, after all, is the way of Jesus in the first place, so let’s begin by returning to that and figure out what a post-evangelical faith in America looks like together.




R. York Moore is the Executive Director, Catalytic Partnerships at InterVarsity Press as well as National Evangelist for InterVarsity USA and Co-Founder of the EveryCampus Movement.
A passionate, visionary leader and an effective communicator, casting vision and leading change through written and oratory talent.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


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Re: Christianity Today Magazine - June 2021
« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2021, 11:06:02 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2021/june/no-longer-evangelical.html








No Longer Evangelical





Is the label 'evangelical' sustainable for Christians in our post-everything world?


R. York Moore is the Executive Director, Catalytic Partnerships at InterVarsity Press as well as National Evangelist for InterVarsity USA and Co-Founder of the EveryCampus Movement.
A passionate, visionary leader and an effective communicator, casting vision and leading change through written and oratory talent.


No idea who this guy is, but I can tell you what he is.  He's yet another butt-hurt anti-Trumper who is letting his politics get in front of his Christianity.  Another 'WOKE' "Christian" social justice warrior of the kind that Christianity Today loves and lives- to promote.

I wouldn't give you a nickel for a copy of this magazine if I'd found the nickel in the street.  These guys promote everything wrong with Christianity Today while railing against it.  White-washed tombs full of dead men's bones.
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