+- +-

+- User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats ezBlock

Members
Total Members: 119
Latest: Bella_777
New This Month: 0
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 18484
Total Topics: 893
Most Online Today: 144
Most Online Ever: 771
(July 30, 2019, 01:13:39 am)
Users Online
Members: 2
Guests: 142
Total: 144

Author Topic: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020  (Read 893 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - August 2020
« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2020, 06:43:05 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2020/september-web-only/bible-passages-persevere-special-issue-graves.html








10 Bible Passages That Help Us Persevere








Study leaders, authors, and scholars share how Scripture has sustained them during difficult times.


When life feels dark or the way ahead is unclear, God’s Word remains a lamp unto our feet and a light unto our path. Here, ten women reflect on Scripture passages that have strengthened and encouraged them during difficult times.


Jo Saxton on Matthew 14:22—36


As a child, I loved this passage. It resonated strongly with me when I realized COVID-19 would change our lives. The rise of the pandemic was like watching a storm brewing: Relatives around the world shared their stories, school was canceled, and my work was canceled or postponed. I read this passage multiple times a day for over a week.

When Peter stepped out of the boat before the storm was still, he walked on the words Jesus said to him. I am challenged to walk on Jesus’ words to me amid life’s storms, even if they don’t make sense. God not only speaks to us through the storms of life, but he also meets with us and speaks to us in the heart of the storm, when we’re at the end of ourselves and all hope is gone.

As a child, I was stunned by the power of God. Now, this passage reminds me of God’s tender kindness, the extraordinary lengths he went to for his friends in need, and how he transformed their lives. Jesus takes time to heal the crowd (vv. 35–36) even though initially he’d avoided the crowd to get some rest. Would I go to extraordinary lengths so my friends could encounter peace, hope, and love?


Jen Wilkin on Psalm 139

As a young, overwhelmed mom, growing in my awareness of my own limits, I needed a vision of a transcendent God to reorient me. Psalm 139 delivers. “Search me, God,” David wrote. "See if there is any offensive way in me” (vv. 23–24). His worshipful response to meditating on the limitlessness of God is a desire to slay what opposes God. I want to be the same: “Put to death, therefore, whatever belongs to your earthly nature” (Col. 3:5). I want my adoration of God to result in an abhorrence of sin.

In times of difficulty, we tend to look inward or to another person or a created thing for help. Initially, I viewed Psalm 139 as God showing interest in all that made me special. But I was surprised to connect the end of the psalm to the beginning, which asks that God continue searching and knowing, testing me, regarding my anxious thoughts and offensive ways. God reads my sins and weaknesses perfectly, and I should ask him to keep doing that. Healthy human relationships are predicated on honoring one another as image-bearers rather than worshiping or demanding worship from one another. When I put my sin to death, my neighbor benefits. Right love of God leads to right love of self and neighbor.

Wilkin is an author and Bible teacher from Dallas. Her books include Women of the Word and None Like Him.


Jeannine K. Brown on Hebrews 12:1-3
I love the image of my journey with Christ as a race. We “press on toward the goal” (Phil. 3:14) with passion and with perseverance. It brings to mind Eugene Peterson’s phrase “a long obedience in the same direction.” The author of Hebrews challenges me to shed whatever hinders me in the race (12:1). Moreover, in this race of faith, I have someone on my side who’s fully invested in that same race. In Jesus, God is on our side, and God is by our side.

Recently, I was struck by the language of joy when meditating on this passage. “For the joy set before him,” Jesus endured the suffering and shame of the cross. Jesus, who reveals God to us, is characterized by joy. Additionally, the first line points us back to Hebrews 11. While meditating on this image of a “cloud of witnesses,” I think of my grandmother, whose faith was enlivened at a revival meeting a century ago and who taught me one of her favorite hymns, “Children of the Heavenly Father,” in Swedish. I am not alone in my journey of faith. We are surrounded by faithful others, both past and present. And Jesus, at the center of our faith, is our guide.

Brown is a professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary and a member of the NIV Committee on Bible Translation. Her most recent book is The Gospels as Stories.


Anjuli Paschall on Mark 10:46-52

I have five kids. When I was struggling, drowning in diapers, a dear friend asked me, “What do you want?” I could tell people what I needed, but I didn’t know what I wanted. I would have a desire—like wanting time alone—and stuff it or suffocate it and then get so angry. I finally grew to understand that for me to love others well, I need to be vulnerable by expressing what I want.

When Bartimaeus gropes his way over to Jesus, they stand face to face. Jesus wants to hear Bartimaeus tell him what he wants. This passage reminds me: God loves me and says, Come over here, get face to face, tell me what you want. It’s vulnerable to tell Jesus what you really, really want. But expressing our wants and longings shows the movement of our hearts, our formation, part of what makes us whole. Speak your greatest heart’s desire to God, whether people tease you, or it’s embarrassing, or it doesn’t make sense. That’s Bartimaeus, right? Even important people told him to be quiet, but he spoke up. May we speak louder like Bartimaeus!

Paschall is a spiritual director and the author of Stay: Discovering Grace, Freedom, and Wholeness Where You Never Imagined Looking.


Carmen Joy Imes on Psalm 10
Years ago, I was under a gag order during an investigation. I felt powerless and alone, with no one to advocate for me. Psalm 10:14 was balm to my soul: “You, God, see the trouble of the afflicted; you consider their grief and take it in hand.” I discovered how powerfully the Psalms address the powerless. They gave me words when I did not know how to pray.

Some people struggle with the apparent violence of the Psalms. In my crisis, I discovered that these psalms align with God’s justice. Yes, God is merciful and compassionate, but he also does not leave the guilty unpunished (Ex. 34:6–7). He not only comforts us but is the kind of God who stops the wicked in their tracks before they can do more harm (Ps. 10:15). The Psalms bolstered my trust in a God who fights on my behalf. They also chasten and challenge me not to participate in the oppression of others. Now, when friends feel powerless or abandoned or attacked, I pray the Psalms on their behalf. God does not ask us to put on a happy face; violent psalms like Psalm 10 invite us to come to God with our most desperate prayers.

Imes is professor of Old Testament at Prairie College. She is the author of Bearing God’s Name: Why Sinai Still Matters.


M. Sydney Park on 1 Corinthians 2:1–5

This passage is always meaningful, especially in the past two decades as we face a pervasive culture of self-promotion in the evangelical church. Believers seem to have lost sight of the necessary mindset of the church as outlined in Philippians 2:5–11: “Have the same mindset as Christ Jesus: Who … made himself nothing … becoming obedient to death.”

First Corinthians 2:1–5 reminds me of the palpable testimony given to the world by the apostles. Conformity to the world is not inevitable, but true proclamation of the gospel message must come by means other than worldly wisdom. This requires cruciformity not only in ethics and identity (being) but also in our method. Paul reminds us that such complete conformity to Christ crucified necessarily results in the mighty work of the Holy Spirit and the power of God. The only way to love our neighbors as Christ loved us is through self-sacrifice.


Park is a professor at Beeson Divinity School with a focus on New Testament theology, biblical interpretation, and Greek.


Kristie Anyabwile on Psalm 18:30
Nothing is beyond the reach or the knowledge of God; his way is perfect. Even though this pandemic and its effects are painful and hard for so many people, God doesn’t change. That helps me to put this season in perspective. It ain’t gonna last; it’s not the end. All we see and experience in this life is but a vapor. Nothing and no one can thwart the outworking of God’s providence. He proves true and will effect what he intends to accomplish in our lives and in the world.

The implied imperative in Psalm 18:30 is to seek God for safety and security—but that’s not always easy because we have our own ideas about what we think we need to have a sense of security. Particularly during these coronavirus times, a verse like this exposes our rugged independence and makes us aware of how out of control we really are. This verse challenges me to be fully dependent on the Lord, to seek him for refuge, and to not seek security in the conveniences of this life.

Anyabwile is a Bible teacher and the editor of His Testimonies, My Heritage: Women of Color on the Word of God.


Vaneetha Rendall Risner on Isaiah 43:1-2

When my ex-husband left our family, I was terrified. How would I manage with my disability? Would my daughters walk away from their faith? How would I manage my household on my own? I felt betrayed and alone, my self-image shattered.

I love how Isaiah 43:1–2 tells me that God calls me by name. He tells me not to fear. He redeems me—which gives me worth. This passage reassures me that whatever I go through, God will be with me and my trials won’t overwhelm me: “When you pass through the waters, I will be with you.”

I’ve sensed God’s presence most closely in suffering—a gift he offers to comfort us in pain. That doesn’t mean we won’t struggle, suffer loss, or even die. I have a close friend with ALS who knows all three will happen. What God promises here is that we won’t be overcome with despair. No matter what’s going on around us, we can be sure God will never leave us. He will walk through every fiery trial with us. He will make sure the rivers do not overwhelm us. And with God beside us, we know there is nothing to fear.

Risner writes and speaks on suffering. Her books include The Scars That Have Shaped Me and Walking Through Fire (Thomas Nelson, January 2021).



Chrystal Evans Hurst on Philippians 4:6-7
My 15-year-old son had a traumatic birth, resulting in nerve damage that led to difficulty in using his right arm his first few months. I was especially anxious and worried during that time—I so badly wanted him to be healed. Peace came over time as I turned to prayer and focused on thinking profitable thoughts—dwelling on what was good and right despite what I couldn’t change.

This passage challenges me to maintain peace by continually coming to God instead of only reactively coming to God when I feel anxiety. If we only focus on the source of anxiety or pain, then we miss the other wonderful things God is doing. Prayer is a weapon, a tool, a source of strength and power.

We don’t have to handle it, or figure everything out on our own, or move mountains in our own strength. We can bring our concerns to God with thanksgiving, ask him for what we want, and then yield to what he wants for us and for those we’re praying for. Prayer will keep our hearts and minds from racing and ease our physical bodies from the havoc stress can wreak on them.

Hurst is a speaker, worship leader, and author. Her books include The 28-Day Prayer Journey and She’s Still There.



Ann Voskamp on Romans 8:31-32

As farmers, we have been living on the edge for 25 years. Our life requires that we trust God at a really deep level—we have droughts, we have bad weather, and so on. Romans 8:32 is our life verse: “He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all—how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things?” This verse has given us Jesus. He will not necessarily give us what we want, but he will give us what we need. If he gave himself up for us all, gave me everything, then he will give me what I need each moment. It is safe to trust.

Trust is the bridge from yesterday to tomorrow, built with what God has done in the past. In trust, we can walk from the known to the unknown. Today, with what we see happening in terms of many of our livelihoods, it looks like the bridge underneath us is going to give way. But when it seems to give way, we are falling into Christ’s safe arms.

So, in trust, I can live generously toward others, thereby destroying the myth of scarcity. We get to live life given away—a cruciform life—and show the world what it means to live in Christ. Stepping into trust is actually what faith means. If I keep thanking him, it builds all those planks of trust for me to step from the known into the unknown.

Voskamp is a speaker, blogger, and author of several books, including The Broken Way and One Thousand Gifts.









Compiled by Marlena Graves, author of The Way Up Is Down and Beautiful Disaster.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - August 2020
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2020, 06:06:32 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2020/september/andrew-wilson-jesus-genealogies-matthew-luke.html








God Knew What He Was Doing When He Gave Jesus Two Family Trees










How to sort out the many disparities between the genealogies of Matthew and Luke.


Problems in Scripture work like speed bumps: They may be frustrating, and they can do damage to the unwary, but they effectively slow us down and focus our attention. Tensions provoke thought. Apparent contradictions force us to wrestle with texts in greater detail. When God inspired them, he knew what he was doing.

Studying the Gospels, we immediately encounter the problem of major differences between the genealogies of Jesus in Matthew and Luke. Matthew 1 lists 42 generations going back to Abraham; Luke 3 has 77 generations going back to Adam. Of the dozens of names between David and Jesus, only five appear on both lists. Worse, Jesus has two different paternal grandfathers: Jacob (Matt. 1:16) and Heli (Luke 3:23).

Efforts to sort out the disparities often focus on Matthew’s side, partly because his genealogy looks more theologically motivated—the numerous gaps, the women who feature, the three groups of 14, and so on. Luke, we assume, is giving “just the facts,” while Matthew is fiddling with them to make a point. But this demeans both the historian in Matthew and the theologian in Luke. I think Luke’s genealogy has a theological agenda just as strong as Matthew’s, if not more so.

Consider how he lists 77 generations from Adam to Christ. That number points to the Sabbath. It reminds us of the 77-fold vengeance of Lamech (Gen. 4:24) and the 77-fold forgiveness of Jesus (Matt. 18:22). It evokes the Jubilee year (Lev. 25:8–55), observed once for every seven sets of seven years. Jesus proclaims his fulfillment of the Jubliee promise in Luke 4:16–21, a development foreshadowed two chapters earlier, when the summons to report home for a census recalls the Jubilee command to return to one’s “family property” (Lev. 25:10).

It’s also noteworthy that Luke introduces his genealogy not at the start of Jesus’ life but at the start of his ministry, when he was “about thirty years old” (3:23). Thirty is a striking number. Priests began their ministry at that age (Num. 4:3), the same age at which David became king (2 Sam. 5:4) and Ezekiel saw prophetic visions of God (Ezek. 1:1). By inserting his genealogy at this stage, Luke is connecting Jesus’ ancestry to his ministry as prophet, priest, and king. By tracing it back to Adam, not just Abraham, he portrays Jesus as a prophet to the nations, a priest for all peoples, and king of the whole earth.

Then there is the question of Jesus’ paternal grandfather(s). Ever since the early third century, people have speculated that Joseph had two fathers, either because he was legally adopted or because he was the child of a levirate marriage. (In this Jewish custom, if a man died without children, his brother would marry the widow to preserve the family line.) If so, then Joseph was the son of both Heli and Jacob. That always sounded like apologetic desperation to me. But then I started noticing all the other references in Luke 3 to levirate marriage or legal adoption.

One relates to Herod and his brother Philip (Luke 3:1). Herod had married Philip’s wife, angering observant Jews—and eventually getting John the Baptist beheaded (Mark 6:17). So Luke’s account of Jesus’ adult life begins with a man enacting an adulterous “levirate marriage” while his brother was still alive.

Another concerns Jesus himself: “He was the son, so it was thought, of Joseph” (Luke 3:23). Legally, Jesus was Joseph’s son, but Joseph was not his biological father. As Gabriel explained to Mary, Jesus would be called “Son of the Most High” and “Son of God” (1:32, 35).

We even find an example in John the Baptist, who famously contrasts himself with one “the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to untie” (3:16). Untying a sandal strap was the key moment in the halizah, the process that released a man from levirate marriage (Deut. 25:9; Ruth 4:7). Perhaps, as Gregory the Great argued, John was declaring himself not just beneath Christ but also unworthy to displace him as Israel’s true husband. John is the best man, not the bridegroom (John 3:29).
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - August 2020
« Reply #15 on: September 19, 2020, 12:32:37 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/news/2020/september/evangelicals-for-trump-faith-voters-campaign-rally-georgia.html








This Election, Evangelical Supporters Have More Faith in Trump












The campaign emphasizes another side of the president at “prayer, praise, and patriotism” rallies.


Joann Roberts had never been to a political rally before.

She prays for President Donald Trump every day and watches messages from his faith advisers online, including televangelists Paula White-Cain and Jentezen Franklin. When Roberts heard they would be speaking at a campaign event in Georgia, the Southern Baptist mom of three took off from her job as a hospital administrator and made the hour-long drive to a field in the far-flung Atlanta suburbs.

Wearing a neon pink shirt printed with the slogan “God, Family, Guns, and Trump,” she fit right in.

The 500-plus crowd at this week’s Evangelicals for Trump rally included local politicians, GOP organizers, and even an unannounced visit by Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, but most were people like Roberts. They were veterans, retired couples, bikers, college students, and homeschool moms, all Christians who felt like this year they needed to do something more to show their support.

Several volunteers distributing hand sanitizer and masks (not required, but around a quarter wore them) said this was their first time working with a political campaign. They traded stories about going door to door for Trump and turning their guest rooms into makeshift call centers. They compared churches and voting districts. They offered compliments over their MAGA gear. “I got it at Ace Hardware,” one woman beamed when asked about her Trump 2020 mask. “They can’t keep them in stock!”

More than anything, these Georgia Christians gushed over what they had seen during Trump’s presidency: a leader who came through on his pledge to appoint conservative justices, defend religious freedom, and oppose abortion. “He really just kept his promises,” said Fred Engel, wearing a red plaid shirt and a volunteer lanyard around his neck. “I don’t remember a single politician in my 68 years who did that.”

While detractors critique the president as divisive, arrogant, and cruel, voters like Engel instead view Trump as a family man, with the devoted support of Ivanka, Don Jr., and Eric, who came out to stump for his father at the Cumming, Georgia, rally. The crowd offered up a collective “amen” when Eric suggested that “in the Bible, it’s always an imperfect person” used by God.

“I believe my father was put here for a reason,” the younger Trump son said. “It was because of a higher deity and entity, and that’s why the evangelical community has rallied around him.”

Despite the white evangelical turnout for Trump before, it wasn’t quite like this last time.

“I believe most evangelicals—most pastors for certain—four years ago probably voted against Hillary Clinton. Four years later, many if not most are voting for Donald Trump,” said Chuck Allen, a local pastor who prayed to open the event. “That’s a significant difference.”

Polls back him up on the first part. A majority of white evangelicals who planned to vote for Trump in 2016 were driven more by their opposition to Clinton than by the appeal of Trump as a candidate, Pew Research showed.

But now, while Trump’s evangelical opponents are more vocal against the president’s polarizing rhetoric and America First policies, supporters instead say they have reason for more enthusiasm. They cite Trump’s conservative stances in office and the spiritual backing of several evangelical leaders who have had an open door to pray with him at the White House throughout his first term.

As sociologist Gerardo Martí wrote, Trump has made inroads with evangelicals “because he engages in actions in support of religiously defined group interests rather than as a result of statements of belief or piety of behavior.” Even with some slips over the first half of the year, more than half of white evangelicals (59%) still “very strongly” approved of the president as of this summer, compared to 29 percent of Americans overall.

The Trump campaign has set out to maximize that support. It amped up its evangelical outreach, beginning with a kickoff event in Miami at the start of the year featuring No. 45 himself and continuing with hundreds of local MAGA meetups and dozens of “prayer, praise, and patriotism” events ahead of the November election.

Leading the charge is the president’s pastor and top prayer partner White-Cain, who recounts how she has served as a spiritual adviser for the businessman-turned-politician for nearly 20 years and took on an official White House role in 2019. She brings along husband Jonathan Cain from the band Journey, leading to requisite references to “Don’t Stop Believin’” and “Faithfully.” At the event, he performed to an audio track of a worship song he wrote called “Freedom in Your Grace.”

The campaign has also enlisted fellow evangelical advisers and pastors like Franklin, whose son now works for the campaign; National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference executive vice president Tony Suarez, who has joined four Evangelicals for Trump events so far this year; and Allen, who was enlisted to join an upcoming event in Phoenix after helping with the one in his area.

Evangelicals for Trump events are set up differently than the larger rallies for a broader Trump crowd, starting off with an invocation and familiar praise music. In a divisive and defensive election year, the gathering in Georgia this week, held outside a local barn event space, hummed with the calm relief of shared faith and shared politics. No rowdy factions. No snarky signs. No hollering or boos.

Attendees, seated in folding chairs spaced a couple feet apart, slowly swayed as they sang along to “This Is Amazing Grace” and “Way Maker,” performed by a stripped-down worship band from Allen’s church, a nearby nondenominational congregation with 4,500 attendees.

While the faith leaders focused mostly on the administration’s victories, Eric Trump criticized the “radical” protesters taking the streets in cities across the US and the decision for some states to allow businesses to reopen before churches.

There were four standing ovations for law enforcement, who were present at the event as security. The only reference to violence faced by black Americans—the inciting incidents leading to the recent protests—came from Franklin, who expressed frustration at false divisions: “It’s like if you’re for President Trump … that means you’re automatically not upset if you see a black man being beaten or choked to death in the streets. I stand for both. I stand for justice and righteousness.”

Perhaps the weather helped things feel particularly peaceful too. It was the coolest day all summer in the area—overcast, breezy, and 70 degrees. The invocation prayer referenced a “God-ordained” forecast.

Even when it began to drizzle, attendees stayed seated, applauding and waving when they noticed Eric Trump sneak out the side of the barn to jet off to his next campaign appearance and mm-hmming in agreement during closing prayers for Americans to vote for “life, faith, and freedom.”

The Evangelicals for Trump events emphasize a softer side of the notoriously combative president, with stories about the president’s faith and family alongside lists of political wins. White-Cain said “it was his idea” to call for prayer against the “evil” of coronavirus. Eric admitted that the Trumps went into the 2016 campaign “not knowing a damn thing about politics,” but they worked together as a family and “God got us here.”

Though he is a vocal Trump supporter, as a pastor, Allen recognizes the tension between the draw of the president’s conservative political priorities and the turnoff of his reputation as a bully.

“President Trump doesn’t make it easy for evangelicals,” said Allen, who built a rapport with Trump’s team during visits to the Mexican border two years ago and to the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian last summer. “I wish you could see a more compassionate Trump that I believe sincerely exists, but there’s just so much bluster around him.”

Allen estimates that his nondenominational, blue-collar congregation, Sugar Hill Church, is about “60 percent Trump and 40 percent anyone-but-Trump,” but the Trump faction has become more eager to take a stand.

Sugar Hill, he said, has benefited from a Trump economy, its members boasting more jobs and more sales, even in recent months. (The statewide unemployment rate has fallen back down to 5.6 percent, better than the national average.) As a result, the church has been able to expand its ministry reach, launching new worship sites and supporting hundreds of families with rent assistance and meal distribution during the pandemic.

The coronavirus pandemic, of course, has become a top issue for voters, and it’s also shaping the way campaigns and elections are being held in 2020. While the Trump campaign has continued to put on in-person events to rally Republican Party faithful, the Believers for Biden outreach has focused on virtual events and discussions.

“I don’t think in-person events will affect mobilization per se, but these events seem to serve a purpose in reinforcing certain aspects of political identity,” said Daniel Bennett, chair of the political science department at John Brown University. “Specifically, those attending events like the Evangelicals for Trump event are telling the world they’re not afraid of COVID and won’t let a pandemic dampen their enthusiasm for the election. Biden faith events, being virtual, align with the Democratic narrative that the pandemic should be treated seriously.”

Evangelicals attending the Georgia event may have had their minds made up about Trump, but the rally urged them to become more involved in getting others to vote for him. “I felt like this was the last ‘charge’ I needed before the election,” said Roberts.

Kemp, the Republican governor who narrowly beat out Democrat Stacey Abrams in 2018, emphasized how individuals could make a big difference for Trump. He suggested attendees think of “10 people you know, from your church, your neighborhood” whom they might register to vote in Georgia. (“In person!” someone yelled from the audience.)

Two tables offered voter registration information, and another had voter guides from the Faith & Freedom Coalition. Like other voter mobilization efforts targeting Christians, the Faith & Freedom Coalition has had fewer opportunities to reach voters in-person now that many churches and community events remain on hold during the pandemic.

The coalition, which typically urges pastors to host a “Registration Sunday” with a voter registration booth in their church lobby, now also offers a video announcement with instructions for registering from home.

“Based on my research, activities in church like voter registration and get-out-the-vote drives are akin to small group activities run by a few for the benefit of many,” said Paul Djupe, a Denison University political scientist who has researched political activity by churches. “I suspect that such activities have collapsed during the pandemic, defaulting to online worship and little else.”

Djupe found that distributing voter guides—like the ones from the Faith & Freedom Coalition—was the most common get-out-the-vote effort by evangelical churches, whereas black Protestant congregations were more than twice as likely to hold voter registration events.

With 49 days to go before the election, Trump backers at Tuesday’s event disagreed over whether the president stands to win in a landslide or another close race, but many repeated the refrain that this was the most important election of their lifetimes. Eric Trump and Allen referenced the potential for additional Supreme Court appointments in the next term. Others expressed broader concerns about freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and the economy being threatened under a Democratic administration.

“I did not get into this to be a politician. I’m a preacher … But I knew if I remained on the sideline and silent, and if all the preachers remained on the sideline and were silent, something was going to happen in the direction of this nation that could not ever be changed back again,” said Franklin, who leads Free Chapel in Gainesville, Georgia.

Speaking to rows dotted with telltale red baseball caps, with “Great Is Thy Faithfulness” playing in the background like an altar call, the pastor offered a closing charge.

“In every election, we have a responsibility to vote our faith. I don’t go in the booth and leave Jesus on the other side,” he said. “If we vote, we win. If we don’t vote, we lose.”
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

Chaplain Mark Schmidt

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Chaplain
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 320
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Location: Kansas City, Missouri
  • Referrals: 0
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2020, 11:41:09 pm »
Several good articles in these posts. 
People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.

George Orwell
Agree Agree x 1 View List

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2020, 12:49:49 am »
Several good articles in these posts.
I agree Chaplain Mark and I'm glad I started this board on the forum. Now it's like a time capsule but keep in mind I do not post every article from the magazine. I choose stories that interest me or that I find possibly interesting to other members and viewers. I already think about looking back on this forum decades from now if I'm still here, God willing.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2020, 07:06:52 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2020/september-web-only/netflix-what-cuties-controversy-says-about-us.html








Why ‘Cuties’ Isn’t Just Netflix’s Problem











The sexual exploitation of children is a symptom of a larger disease—one that we’re complicit in.


On September 9, independent French film Les Mignonnes made its American debut on Netflix under the title Cuties. While director Maïmouna Doucouré intends the film as a critique of the sexual exploitation of children, she quickly found her work facing condemnation for participating in that very thing. Within days, #CancelNetflix was trending and the film had received an astounding 1.06/10 audience rating on Rotten Tomatoes (as of publishing date).

Part of the public outcry targeted Netflix’s problematic marketing of Cuties earlier in August. If design is communication, the chosen images, description, and subtext did not critique a culture that sexually exploits young girls. It actively played into it, issuing an invitation to come gaze on the actors as they engage in “free-spirited” dance.

The film itself also faces difficult questions about the ethics of using child actors to portray the process of sexualization. Abuse survivor and advocate Rachael Denhollander tweeted: “One can’t protest sexualizing children by … sexualizing them.” And Vox movie critic and former Christianity Today columnist Alissa Wilkinson pointed out that “trying to depict something in the context of critiquing it isn’t always successful.”

The ambiguous nature of sexual exploitation within Western culture explains both the controversy surrounding Cuties and the thesis of the film itself. While public condemnation has been sure and swift, it sometimes misses the pressing questions about whether our society is safe for children: What if the sexualization of young girls is not a bug but a feature? What if Netflix knows something about us that we don’t about ourselves?

The central character of Cuties is Amy, an 11-year-old Senegalese immigrant living in France with her mother and two younger brothers. The story echoes Doucouré’s own childhood, caught between a permissive Western culture that exploited girls one way and a traditional culture that exploited them in other ways. Longing for love and connection, Amy quickly intuits what Western culture values and begins to adapt. She recognizes that this new land of smartphones, social media, and hyper-sexualization rewards her for objectifying herself. But limited by both age and her outsider experience, Amy does not know where suggestive pop culture ends and pornography begins. As she discovers increasingly explicit material online, she mimics it adding erotic behavior, dress, and mannerisms to her dance repertoire—all while oblivious to Western culture’s tacit agreements about which sexual behaviors are socially acceptable and which are not.

The challenge of the film is that there are no obvious villains. No basement-dwelling perverts luring Amy over the internet. No trusted family friend grooming her for abuse. Instead, the film presents the banality of evil and how easily a young girl dropped into Western culture might be exploited by subtle cues and behaviors that exist in the light of day. There are no pedophiles hiding behind every corner on whom we can neatly blame the sexualization of girlhood.

One could undoubtedly argue that the exploitation of young girls overflows from a decadent society, one where sex sells. It’s true: Sex does sell. And at some point, the most hardened don’t care who is being sold. Child trafficking is real, and Netflix did market the film in a provocative way.

Yet the hyper-sexualization of our society doesn’t answer why children are sexualized. What kind of culture exploits their young this way? What kind of culture both condemns pedophilia and sells padded bras to pre-pubescent girls? Why did Netflix think that their marketing would work?

To answer this question, we must understand the degree to which our society does not value childhood in the first place. Denhollander’s memoir exposing the serial predator Larry Nassar asks the question in her title: What Is a Girl Worth? She presses into the structures and value systems that allowed Nassar to continue abusing young girls for years. Ultimately, children are threatened by both predators and a culture that does not hear them when they cry out for help.

Protecting children at the risk of destabilizing powerful organizations or indicting beloved adults means asking ourselves not just "What is a girl worth?" but “What are we willing to pay?” This question ultimately exposes our larger cultural value systems. We prize efficiency. Children are inefficient. We value wealth creation. Children are costly and can’t pay their own way. We honor independence and radical autonomy. Children are dependent and hamper our freedom. We drive toward what Wendell Berry calls “the objective.” Children like to take the long, meandering route home.

It’s no wonder, then, that such a society, would increasingly find ways to truncate childhood. Instead of making space for children to be children, we under-support and undervalue those who care for them, whether in the home or the classroom. We ask fifth-graders to map out their career goals. We hire private coaches to improve their pitching, not so they can enjoy baseball with their friends, but to prepare them for the “future.” And thus by rushing our kids through childhood, we ensure that prolonged adolescence extends in both directions.

With a smaller window of childhood, children naturally begin to adopt postures and traits associated with burgeoning adulthood. In a society that worships unchecked sexual expression, these attitudes necessarily include overt sexuality. The more children are led this way, the more likely they are to be abused by those who manipulate their intellectual and emotional naiveté—proffering “she looked older” as an excuse. While pedophilia certainly exists, the objectification and sexualization of young girls in Western culture has as much do with our complicity in viewing them as women before they truly are.

If you are outraged by the sexual exploitation of young girls, you’re in good company. In Matthew 18, Jesus warns that those who would harm children will face his wrath, and it would be better for them to have a millstone hung around their neck and be thrown into the sea than cause a little one to stumble.

But Jesus’ strong words do not stem from a selective focus on child trafficking or pedophilia. Instead, they are rooted in a holistic understanding of the goodness of childhood and the unique role that children play in God’s kingdom. Just before he warns us that we must not harm children, he commands us to actively welcome them. And he said:

“Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Therefore, whoever takes the lowly position of this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me.” (Matt. 18:2–5)

Part of the goodness of childhood is that children remind us of our own dependence on God. Vulnerable, limited, and wholly reliant on others to protect them, children show us how we must come to the kingdom. They show us the only way we can come. The very things that our culture disdains about childhood are the very things that God honors.

If we are to truly protect children in such a culture, it will require more than boycotts, political posturing, or public stances. It will require a willingness to disturb our own organizations and question the value systems that tell us that children are not worthy of our time, resources, and care. It will require aligning our hearts with the heart of God who delights to care for children in their weakness, who celebrates them despite their inefficiencies, and who honors them as image-bearers, even now.










Hannah Anderson is the author of Made for More, All That’s Good, and Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul.


Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2020, 02:01:23 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2020/september/kingdom-of-god-and-supreme-court-of-united-states.html








The Kingdom of God and the Supreme Court of the United States













Thoughts on the kingdom of God and the common good.


The phrase, “The Kingdom of God,” has been in the news recently given that Amy Coney Barrett is on President Trump’s short list of nominees to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died last week.

As one can imagine given our tense and toxic political environment, many Democrats are up in arms about the prospect of President Trump nominating a Supreme Court Justice between now and the election on November 3rd. Many of them, including former Vice President and Democratic presidential nominee, Joe Biden, believe that Trump should postpone the nomination until after the election.

Not only are Democrats upset that President Trump may proceed with a nomination, they are uncomfortable with Amy Coney Barrett, the supposed front runner for the nomination.

Why would many Democrats be uncomfortable with Barrett? Aside from being mentored by Antonin Scalia and a proponent of originalism, statutory interpretation, and stare decisis, she is a devout Roman Catholic. For Barrett', her faith intersects with her vocation. While speaking to graduates of the Notre Dame Law School years ago, Professor Barrett addressed what it meant to be a “different kind of lawyer.” She stated, a “legal career is but a means to an end. . . and that end is building the kingdom of God."

In short, the language of building the kingdom of God has people uncomfortable.

It should not—it is basic language used across different Christian traditions and denominations.

What is the Kingdom of God?

The “Kingdom of God”—or simply put, the rule and reign of God—is something that practically every Christian tradition embraces, albeit with a wide range of understanding and application.

For brevity and simplicity, I want to note four elements to what constitutes the Kingdom of God.

First, the King.

In the Kingdom of God, God—or YHWH—is King. And in a kingdom, everything revolves around the king; in Scripture, that means the glory of YHWH. As the Scriptures unfold, YHWH is revealed in the person of Jesus Christ. Now, Jesus more specifically, is the King in the Kingdom of God.

Second, the domain.

There is a territory over which the king reigns. In the Gospel of Matthew, the recurring phrase, “Kingdom of Heaven,” is used to describe what Jesus inaugurated in his coming. Elsewhere, it is referred to the “Kingdom of God.” In addition, Jesus, in his teaching on prayer, instructs his disciples at one point to pray, “Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”

Jesus gives more detail to, and is the personification of, the Old Testament teaching that God is bringing his rule to earth. In creation, God established earth as his domain over which he rules. Isaiah 66:1 states, “This is what the Lord says: ‘Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool.” God created earth as a domain to extend his reign.

Third, the citizens of the kingdom.

A note that combines this element with the second element is that in creating Adam and Eve as his image bearers, God establishes the fact that earth is his. It was common in antiquity for earthly kings to erect images of themselves and place them in far flung corners of their kingdom signifying that domain is under their reign.

Throughout Scripture God seeks to be in personal communion and covenant with his people. Israel was to be God’s people, living in the Promised Land, to serve as a “kingdom of priests.”

In the New Testament, Jesus (both the better Adam and Israel) through his death, resurrection, ascension, and sending of the Spirit, gives birth to the church. The church isn’t the Kingdom, it is a representation (or reflection) of the fully coming Kingdom. Nevertheless, they are citizens of the already but not yet Kingdom. In Revelation we read, “Look, God’s dwelling is with humanity, and he will live with them. They will be his peoples, and God himself will be with them and will be their God” (Rev 21:3).

Fourth, the rule of life.

The king reigns through a set of laws and statues that govern the people of his land—for his glory. Also, these laws are meant to reflect the nature, character, and attributes of the king and his kingdom.

A Theological Understanding and Application of God’s Kingdom

Theological interpretations and applications of the Kingdom of God are vast, and this one brief article will hardly touch on them. In my book, Subversive Kingdom, I say much more.

One of the more common understandings of the Kingdom of God is the Two Kingdom view (which still has its nuances) originally articulated by Augustine in The City of God and later developed by reformers like Martin Luther.

Two Kingdoms adherents generally claim the Bible teaches that God rules all of creation in two distinct ways; one through the “common kingdom” in which all people operate by natural revelation, and the second through the “redemptive kingdom” in which Christians are ruled by special revelation. Two Kingdom adherents believe that Christians should not impose biblical standards on society but instead appeal to common understandings of the good, the true, and the beautiful shared by all people. Within the realm of the “redemptive kingdom,” they hold that believers are nurtured through the church by means of preaching, the sacraments, and participating in Christian community. (See Tim Keller, Center Church, 194–217).

The church as citizens of the “already but not yet” kingdom participates in the mission of God—to redeem a people for himself from every tribe, nation, and tongue. The church participates by sharing and showing the gospel of King Jesus, the Spirit of God works subversively through believers to expose the darkness, to convict sinners, to invite people into becoming a new creation in Christ, and to catch a glimpse of the future consummated Kingdom of God.

Concern Over Building God’s Kingdom

This understanding of the Kingdom of God doesn’t describe every tradition’s view—I don’t know if it represents the view of Amy Coney Barrett. However, I tend not to use the word “build” in this context, but I do know many who would eagerly support a Supreme Court nominee who sees their vocation as a platform to engage as a citizen of the Kingdom of God.

Many would celebrate such an appointment, while others—perhaps especially less religious and/or more secular people—would be concerned about a judge or justice using such language. It seems Washington Post writer Ron Charles is concerned as he tweeted, “Amy Coney Barrett, the judge at the top of Trump’s list to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg, has said we should always remember that ‘a legal career is but a means to an end… and that end is building the Kingdom of God.'”

So, yes, there are political differences here for many reasons. My intent is not to address all of those in this short article. However, the concern about kingdom language is also worth exploring, as I’ve tried to do here. Yes, for some, “building the kingdom of God” would be seen as an obstacle. But as my good friend Karen Swallow Prior tweeted in response to Charles, “Better to appoint/elect people who want to make hell on earth, I guess?”

For me, teaching at a school with the motto, “for Christ and Kingdom,” this language is normal and widespread in the Christian church. If you want to oppose this nomination, I hope it is not because of this basic Christian terminology and emphasis.

My prayer echoes that of our King, “Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” If God chooses to answer such a prayer during this transition period between inauguration and consummation of the Kingdom of God, I know that life will be valued, morality grounded, equality advanced, justice served, religious freedom upheld, and God will be honored. And these are the things that at her very root, makes America great.








Ed Stetzer is executive director of the Wheaton College Billy Graham Center, serves as a dean at Wheaton College, and publishes church leadership resources through Mission Group. The Exchange Team contributed to this article and has updated the article.

Josh Laxton currently serves as the Assistant Director of the Wheaton College Billy Graham Center, Lausanne North American Coordinator at Wheaton College. He has a Ph.D. in North American Missiology from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2020, 02:05:01 pm »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2020/september-web-only/supreme-court-evangelical-issues-ruth-bader-ginsburg-trump.html








Why the Supreme Court Makeup Matters Beyond Abortion









Legal experts cite religious freedom and free speech among the major issues for evangelicals in a post–Ruth Bader Ginsburg court.


Last week’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsberg represents the third opportunity for President Donald Trump to nominate a Supreme Court justice.

A third of evangelicals by belief cited Supreme Court nominees and abortion stance as reasons for voting for Trump in 2016. Many evangelicals and pro-life Americans have celebrated the possibility that another conservative justice could shift the Court toward overturning Roe v. Wade and reshaping abortion law in the country. Yet the new makeup of the Court will address crucial issues for the church that extend far beyond abortion.

CT asked legal experts how a new Supreme Court appointment replacing Ginsburg stands to affect evangelicals outside of Roe v. Wade. Here are their responses, calling out issues such as religious freedom, racial equality, child protection, and free speech.

Barry P. McDonald, law professor at Pepperdine University:

As it stands, the Supreme Court is controlled by a majority of five solid conservative justices who either have a strong record of supporting religious freedom rights or give every indication that they will develop such a record. If President Trump succeeds in appointing Justice Ginsburg’s successor, that will likely add one more justice to this coalition. While an additional vote is not necessary to maintain this trend, it could prove important to religious freedom proponents in cases where Chief Justice John Roberts might moderate his vote in an attempt to shield the Court as an institution from charges that it has become too political and divisive (or where any conservative justice moderates his or her vote for whatever reason). This is most likely to occur in cases where religious beliefs might conflict with laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual and gender orientation. Indeed, both Roberts and Justice Neil Gorsuch recently alluded to such future contests in voting to interpret federal workplace laws as barring such discrimination.

Kim Colby, director of the Christian Legal Society’s Center of Law and Religious Freedom:
Justice Ginsburg’s replacement potentially could provide a more secure footing for our basic human right of religious freedom. In 27 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Ginsburg heard over 30 religious freedom cases. Unfortunately, her support for religious freedom was lackluster.

Justice Ginsburg previously voted in favor of religious schools’ freedom to choose their teachers but then voted against that right in a recent case. She voted once for—and three times against—robust application of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. Her two votes in favor of prisoners’ religious freedom, as well as a Muslim employee’s right to wear a hijab, were commendable. But four times, she voted to uphold the government’s exclusion of religious speech from the public square.

Justice Ginsburg advanced a theory of the Establishment Clause that excluded religious students from government programs funding education. Several times she voted to remove religious symbols from public property. When comparing her votes in recent cases to votes by Justice Neil Gorsuch and Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the comparison suggests that someone nominated by President Trump likely will be a good steward of religious freedom.

Lynne Marie Kohm, law professor at Regent University:
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s replacement can make a dynamic difference for America’s children in three key cases—one past, one present, and one (hopefully) future.

Past: Transgender rights—Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia. The Court held that firing an individual for being transgender violates Title VII. Ginsburg’s replacement could alter future transgender rulings, particularly as biological female athletes seek to protect their rights in girls’ sports.

Present: Foster care—Fulton v. Philadelphia. First Amendment rights of Christians who provide foster care are at stake as the Court soon determines whether the government can condition a religious agency’s ability to participate in the foster care system on practices that contradict its religious beliefs.

Future (hopefully): Child pornography. In 2002, Ashcroft v. Free Speech Coalition struck down two provisions of the Child Pornography Prevention Act of 1996 as overbroad, giving a tremendous win to the adult-entertainment industry. Child pornography has since proliferated. Children need protections that a Ginsburg replacement could help deliver.

Beyond Roe, American evangelicals want to see all children protected, born and unborn.

Thomas Berg, law professor at the University of St. Thomas:
One obvious evangelical priority for the Court’s new justice (beyond abortion) is religious freedom, which the Court already strongly supports. Majorities of 5–7 justices have protected religious schools’ right to hire the religion teachers they choose, employers’ right to object to covering employees’ contraception, and families’ right to choose religious schools for their children and still receive government educational assistance. Justice Ginsburg dissented from all those rights; the new nominee will strengthen them.

But the nominee should also be questioned about another priority: racial equality. Christians must care about this because racism denies that some fellow humans have their full God-given dignity. And justices should care because the Constitution’s Fourteenth Amendment was meant to eliminate practices that had kept black people constricted even after their formal enslavement ended. Republican appointees typically commit to enforcing a provision’s “original meaning.” The next justice should apply the amendment vigorously to racially unjust practices of our day.

Carl H. Esbeck, law professor emeritus at the University of Missouri:
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an effective legal activist, first for the ACLU and later as a high court justice. To admire her work depends on whether one believes the role of a judge is to align the law with one’s sense of justice or is it to subordinate the self to the nation’s organic documents and the rule of law. Unlike Justice Ginsburg, we can aspire to a successor who will interpret the US. Constitution in accord with the original meaning of the adopted text. I also hope for reconsideration of the free speech case of Hastings Chapter of the Christian Legal Society v. Martinez. Authored by Justice Ginsburg, this was a 5-4 decision denying student religious organizations access to meeting space at a state university campus without first agreeing that there be no qualification that the organization’s student officers and members conform to a statement of faith.

Rena M. Lindevaldsen, law professor at Liberty University:


Conservative justices view the Constitution as a source of, and limit on, their power, recognizing that the separation of powers best protects our God-given liberties and that the Constitution contains an amendment provision to make changes when necessary. Liberal justices circumvent that amendment provision and simply change or create law to suit what they believe the culture desires. But when those justices promote the “right” of people to do whatever pleases them amidst a culture that promotes “godlessness and wickedness” (Rom. 1:18), government punishes those who proclaim the unchanging truth of Scripture.

That punishment takes many forms, including firing employees who will not promote a particular agenda, arresting sidewalk counselors, singling out churches for censorship, labeling the truth of Scripture as hate speech, or stripping people of the right to self-defense against a despotic government. Appointing the right justice helps us, as Justice Scalia said, guard “against the black-robed supremacy.”
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2020, 10:53:41 am »
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2020, 08:28:33 am »

https://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2020/september/kendi-barrett-adoption.html








Dr. Ibram Kendi, Amy Coney Barrett and Evangelical Adoption






Transracial adoption doesn't make you non-racist. But it doesn't make you racist either.


Over this past weekend, Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to Be an Antiracist, drew attention for his bold tweets in response to a since-deleted tweet of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s sister holding two Black children. Amy Coney Barrett herself has adopted two children from Haiti. He stated, in multiple tweets:

Some White colonizers “adopted” Black children. They “civilized” these “savage” children in the “superior” ways of White people, while using them as props in their lifelong pictures of denial, while cutting the biological parents of these children out of the picture of humanity.
And whether this is Barrett or not is not the point. It if a belief too many White people have: if they have or adopt a child of color, then they can’t be racist.
After receiving pushback from other users on the platform, he further clarified his position:

I’m challenging the idea that White parents of kids of color are inherently “not racist” and the bots completely change what I’m saying to “White parents of kids of color are inherently racist.” These live and fake bots are good at their propaganda. Let’s not argue with them.
I am nowhere near the first person to critique his comments, but I would like to re-examine them in the light of the wider relationship between evangelical Christians and adoption, as well as my own personal experience as a transracial adoptee.

Does adoption make you “non-racist”? The short answer is no.

Dr. Kendi’s remarks are not about evangelicals in particular, but it is not difficult to come to the conclusion that his critique may have something to do with a religious movement that has unfortunately become synonymous with “white in America.” Kendi was responding to Amy Coney Barrett’s family, a woman who seems to have become the Ruth Bader Ginsburg for conservatives since her nomination to the Supreme Court was announced.

Kendi isn’t the first public figure to make such condemning statement about the evangelical adoption movement. In 2013, The Exchange published an article in response to a NPR interview with Kathryn Joyce, author of The Child Catchers: Rescue, Trafficking, and the New Gospel of Adoption, which I encourage you to read. Evangelicals have been coming under fire for the adoption movement for quite a while.

Joyce claimed that the current evangelical adoption movement was an attempt to make evangelicals look better in the media. By and large, I have not found this to be true, but I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the story of family vloggers James and Myka Stauffer, who are Christians, who found themselves in the middle of a controversy this summer after “re-homing” an autistic child they adopted from China.

To give a brief synopsis, the Stauffers chose to adopt this child from China and then decided to re-home him once they realized they could not provide for his needs, despite being warned repeatedly of the high level of need this child required throughout the adoption process. Due to their occupation as family vloggers, they directly profited off of this young child’s presence in their videos. As crude as it sounds, they did gain positive PR from adopting a child with disabilities, but once the adoption became too difficult, the child was no longer a part of their family.

Unfortunately, there is a grain of truth to Joyce’s claims, as well as Kendi’s. But it is just that: a grain. Many white people believe that if they have adopted a child of color, then they are automatically not racist. It is similar to the "Some of my best friends are Black" defense. And just like that defense, it does not hold up. This is a conversation I’ve had with my own white family. Just because I am not white and a part of their family does not mean their implicit biases are any less real. How you view the nonwhite person in your family, that you might have raised, is bound to be a different valuation than the person of color you see on the street.

I acknowledge the truth in Kendi’s claim, and actually agree with the idea that white parents of kids of color cannot claim to be inherently “not racist” because of their adopted child.

However, I find nearly everything else about his tweets indefensible, particularly after reflecting on my own story of transracial adoption.

Please don’t dehumanize my experience to make a socio-political statement.

First, I’d like to acknowledge that I am not Black, nor am I the spokesperson for all adoptees. Each adoptee’s experience is incredibly varied and I’ve never experienced what it means to be Black in America. I have, however, experienced what it means to be brown in America.

In 2001, I was adopted at a young age from a Christian orphanage in Hyderabad, India. The family that adopted me—my family—lived in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As you might be able to guess, they are white. My adoptive mother traveled across the world, by herself, to make me a part of her family. I think that’s an act of love, that someone wanted me bad enough to seek me out. My adoptive father grew up in the foster care system in Minneapolis, Minnesota. My parents were not strangers to what it means to be an orphan. They already had one child, my older brother. I didn’t just happen to be a part of my family— I was chosen.

Growing up, I remember attending SILC (School of Indian Language and Culture) on Saturday mornings so that I could be around other people who looked like me, and be immersed in my own culture—there were no white children there. On one of my first days in the United States, my family brought me to the mall to get my ears pierced, as is customary for Indian babies. Hyderabad is known as the “City of Pearls,” so my adoptive mom brought home pearls that I still have today. Perhaps Kendi would see these acts as using me as a prop, but I see them as marks of unconditional love—an unconditional love that seeks to acknowledge my cultural identity in any way that it can.

Kendi also states that these “colonizers” are “cutting the biological parents of these children out of the picture of humanity.” I don’t know how else to respond to this but by saying this reality: They were already gone. If my biological parents had the capacity or desire to be in my life, I wouldn’t have been in an orphanage. That’s not my adoptive parents’ fault. It certainly isn’t my fault. That might not even be my birth parents’ fault, but rather the result of a system that failed all of us.

My story is not representative of the stories of all adoptees—but neither are Kendi’s accusatory statements. Kendi portrays transracial adoption as inherently evil, as just another part of the very real, and very sinful, system of racism that perpetrates all of our lives. Adoption, like many things, is not that simple, and the notion that it can be undermines my experience, my family, and my very existence. Am I any less brown because my family is white? I don’t think so.

Without transracial adoption, I can’t guarantee that I would be alive, much less alive, educated, and writing this very article.










Sitara Roden is a recent addition to The Exchange and serves as Managing Editor. Roden also serves as Promotions Strategist at the Wheaton College Billy Graham Center.
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

patrick jane

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10807
  • Karma: +1010/-0
  • Research Jesus Christ - Research Flat Earth
  • Location: Homeless in God's Flat Earth
  • Referrals: 41
    • Theology Forums
Re: Christianity Today Magazine - September 2020
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2020, 09:04:33 am »
 ???
Hearing, believing and trusting the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross; His death, burial and resurrection for the forgiveness of sins and REPENTING, seals us with that Holy Spirit of Promise - EPHESIANS 1:10-14 KJV - The Lord is not slack concerning His promise. 2 Peter 3:9 KJV - 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 KJV - Ephesians 1:10-14 KJV - Romans 10:9-10 KJV - Romans 10:13 - Romans 10:17 - Ephesians 1:7 KJV - Colossians 1:14 KJV -


Copyright Disclaimer: All audio and music belongs to the owner/creator. This is a non-profit. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
13 Replies
3148 Views
Last post October 10, 2020, 08:55:52 am
by patrick jane
14 Replies
2818 Views
Last post October 10, 2020, 08:59:37 am
by patrick jane
22 Replies
2147 Views
Last post October 10, 2020, 09:02:17 am
by patrick jane
19 Replies
1462 Views
Last post October 10, 2020, 09:02:34 am
by patrick jane
40 Replies
1358 Views
Last post October 10, 2020, 09:03:21 am
by patrick jane

+-Recent Topics

Trump 2020 - Winning !!! by patrick jane
Today at 12:56:00 am

Politics Today by patrick jane
Today at 12:55:43 am

Re: Trump 2020 - Winning !!! by patrick jane
Today at 12:55:21 am

Re: Politics Today by patrick jane
Today at 12:55:08 am

VIDEO POETRY BY KEN ALLAN DRONSFIELD by patrick jane
Today at 12:03:21 am

Scriptures - Verse Of The Day and Discussion by Chaplain Mark Schmidt
October 23, 2020, 10:35:12 pm

Your Favorite Music, Images and Memes by patrick jane
October 23, 2020, 09:48:39 am

The Monsanto Papers by patrick jane
October 23, 2020, 04:30:32 am

What weapons do we fight with? by patrick jane
October 22, 2020, 11:11:47 pm

Ministry On Video by Lion Of Judah by patrick jane
October 22, 2020, 11:11:30 pm

Hidden Teachings Of The Bible by patrick jane
October 22, 2020, 11:09:26 pm

BIBLE GOSPELS by Chaplain Mark Schmidt
October 22, 2020, 10:43:46 pm

1ST PETER WAS WRITTEN TO ISRAEL PART 1 by Bladerunner
October 22, 2020, 10:26:00 pm

KEEP THE COMMANDMENTS by Bladerunner
October 22, 2020, 09:15:35 pm

WAS PETER TALKING TO YOU ? by Bladerunner
October 22, 2020, 09:11:18 pm

ISRAEL WILL REIGN ON THE EARTH by Bladerunner
October 22, 2020, 09:09:03 pm

ISRAEL IN THE TRIBULATION by Bladerunner
October 22, 2020, 09:03:35 pm

The Five Discourses of Jesus by Chaplain Mark Schmidt
October 22, 2020, 06:50:31 pm